11 Songs, 55 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Following a life-changing move to New York City, The Antlers’ frontman Peter Silberman took two years to complete Hospice. The stark “Prologue” bleeds into an equally moody “Kettering,” an ice storm of a song where Silberman’s voice actually sounds like he’s singing quietly from the bed of a hospital while the world outside his window succumbs to the harsh elements. That is until “Sylvia” finds him howling at his muse like the throws of death are upon him. Exploring sonic textures akin to Flying Saucer Attack, this song explodes and blossoms with unfolding topographies of distorted aural textures that beautifully go against the grain of Silberman’s androgynous voice — meanwhile tangled tape loops and blizzards of guitar feedback almost drown and suffocate some matadorian horns that all recall the ghosts of shoegaze past — more specifically the song “Spaniard” from Boo Radleys” 1992 album Everything’s Alright Forever. Silberman births tectonic layers of noise and sound that shift and rumble like earthquakes one moment, while gently lulling listeners to a peaceful rest the next moment.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Following a life-changing move to New York City, The Antlers’ frontman Peter Silberman took two years to complete Hospice. The stark “Prologue” bleeds into an equally moody “Kettering,” an ice storm of a song where Silberman’s voice actually sounds like he’s singing quietly from the bed of a hospital while the world outside his window succumbs to the harsh elements. That is until “Sylvia” finds him howling at his muse like the throws of death are upon him. Exploring sonic textures akin to Flying Saucer Attack, this song explodes and blossoms with unfolding topographies of distorted aural textures that beautifully go against the grain of Silberman’s androgynous voice — meanwhile tangled tape loops and blizzards of guitar feedback almost drown and suffocate some matadorian horns that all recall the ghosts of shoegaze past — more specifically the song “Spaniard” from Boo Radleys” 1992 album Everything’s Alright Forever. Silberman births tectonic layers of noise and sound that shift and rumble like earthquakes one moment, while gently lulling listeners to a peaceful rest the next moment.

TITLE TIME
2:34
5:11
5:27
7:40
3:53
3:11
5:55
3:45
8:44
5:28
11 3:40

About The Antlers

Evolving from Peter Silberman's bedroom recordings to a fully realized band, for Brooklyn-based the Antlers, what started out as a solo lo-fi folk project progressed quickly into a colossal-sounding chamber pop group. After self-recording a handful of albums in a kamikaze fashion -- Uprooted (recorded just before and after moving in 2007), The February Tape (recorded in a bathtub in an hour), In the Attic of the Universe (a single ambient song stretched into an album), and Cold War (an album with only acoustic guitar and vocals, recorded in a week) -- Silberman set forth to record his opus, Hospice, in July of 2007. Recorded over the course of almost two years, Hospice started out as another solo project before Silberman started incorporating other musicians, including drummer Michael Lerner and multi-instrumentalist Darby Cicci, who eventually ended up as permanent members of the Antlers. Upon its release, Hospice received critical acclaim, with NPR and Pitchfork shouting high praises. After touring behind the album, the Antlers returned to the studio for a more electronic-minded follow-up titled Burst Apart, which was released in 2011. The album was shortly followed that same year by the Together EP and in the summer of 2012 the group issued Undersea, a four song EP with an aquatic theme as well as overall sound. It wasn't until 2014 that they returned with fourth album Familiars, recorded entirely by the band at their Brooklyn studio, then mixed by Chris Coady, known for his studio work with Beach House, Yeah Yeah Yeahs and other indie stars. ~ Jason Lymangrover

  • ORIGIN
    New York, NY [Brooklyn]
  • FORMED
    2006

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