11 Songs, 55 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Following a life-changing move to New York City, The Antlers’ frontman Peter Silberman took two years to complete Hospice. The stark “Prologue” bleeds into an equally moody “Kettering,” an ice storm of a song where Silberman’s voice actually sounds like he’s singing quietly from the bed of a hospital while the world outside his window succumbs to the harsh elements. That is until “Sylvia” finds him howling at his muse like the throws of death are upon him. Exploring sonic textures akin to Flying Saucer Attack, this song explodes and blossoms with unfolding topographies of distorted aural textures that beautifully go against the grain of Silberman’s androgynous voice — meanwhile tangled tape loops and blizzards of guitar feedback almost drown and suffocate some matadorian horns that all recall the ghosts of shoegaze past — more specifically the song “Spaniard” from Boo Radleys” 1992 album Everything’s Alright Forever. Silberman births tectonic layers of noise and sound that shift and rumble like earthquakes one moment, while gently lulling listeners to a peaceful rest the next moment.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Following a life-changing move to New York City, The Antlers’ frontman Peter Silberman took two years to complete Hospice. The stark “Prologue” bleeds into an equally moody “Kettering,” an ice storm of a song where Silberman’s voice actually sounds like he’s singing quietly from the bed of a hospital while the world outside his window succumbs to the harsh elements. That is until “Sylvia” finds him howling at his muse like the throws of death are upon him. Exploring sonic textures akin to Flying Saucer Attack, this song explodes and blossoms with unfolding topographies of distorted aural textures that beautifully go against the grain of Silberman’s androgynous voice — meanwhile tangled tape loops and blizzards of guitar feedback almost drown and suffocate some matadorian horns that all recall the ghosts of shoegaze past — more specifically the song “Spaniard” from Boo Radleys” 1992 album Everything’s Alright Forever. Silberman births tectonic layers of noise and sound that shift and rumble like earthquakes one moment, while gently lulling listeners to a peaceful rest the next moment.

TITLE TIME
11

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