iTunes

Opening the iTunes Store.If iTunes doesn't open, click the iTunes application icon in your Dock or on your Windows desktop.Progress Indicator
Opening the iBooks Store.If iBooks doesn't open, click the iBooks app in your Dock.Progress Indicator
iTunes

iTunes is the world's easiest way to organize and add to your digital media collection.

We are unable to find iTunes on your computer. To preview and buy music from 'Hours...' by David Bowie, download iTunes now.

Already have iTunes? Click I Have iTunes to open it now.

I Have iTunes Free Download
iTunes for Mac + PC

'Hours...'

Open iTunes to preview, buy, and download music.

Album Review

Since David Bowie spent the '90s jumping from style to style, it comes as a shock that Hours, his final album of the decade, is a relatively straightforward affair. Not only that, but it feels unlike anything else in his catalog. Bowie's music has always been a product of artifice, intelligence, and synthesis. Hours is a relaxed, natural departure from this method. Arriving after two labored albums, the shift in tone is quite refreshing. "Thursday's Child," the album's engaging mid-tempo opener, is a good indication of what lays ahead. It feels like classic Bowie, yet recalls no specific era of his career. For the first time, Bowie has absorbed all the disparate strands of his music, from Hunky Dory through Earthling. That doesn't mean Hours is on par with his earlier masterworks; it never attempts to be that bold. What it does mean is that it's the first album where he has accepted his past and is willing to use it as a foundation for new music. That's the reason why Hours feels open, even organic — he's no longer self-conscious, either about living up to his past or creating a new future. It's a welcome change, and it produces some fine music, particularly on the first half of the record, which is filled with such subdued, subtly winning songs as "Something in the Air," "Survive," and "Seven." Toward the end of the album, Bowie branches into harder material, which isn't quite as successful as the first half of the album, yet shares a similar sensibility. And that's what's appealing about Hours — it may not be one of Bowie's classics, but it's the work of a masterful musician who has begun to enjoy his craft again and isn't afraid to let things develop naturally.

Customer Reviews

Listen to the outtakes on the Expanded Edition

I like all the songs on this album, but there are some awesome outtake songs that would have taken this album up a notch had they been on it, like "No-one Calls", "We All Go Through", "We Shall Go to Town", and the Marius De Vries mixes of "Survive" and "Seven".

Hah...

Yeah, this is actually Bowie’s worst album. I hate saying this only 2 months after his death, but I gave it a listen and it’s really boring. All the songs sound the same. Bowie’s vocals are banal and don’t really go well with the music. If you’re someone trying to buy every Bowie album, maybe possibly skip this one.

Definitely 5 STARS DT 2769

I play "Hours" over and over and don't get tired of it. Years pass and I play it again and it is not dated. This music is "experimental" because it not the normal Bowie "experimental" stuff he does. He sings beautiful songs without any strange stuff. His voice is wonderful and the songs are well written.

Biography

Born: January 8, 1947 in Brixton, London, England

Genre: Rock

Years Active: '60s, '70s, '80s, '90s, '00s, '10s

Everyone has a David Bowie that they fell in love with first—the otherworldly outsider Ziggy Stardust, the electronic adventurer, the wild-eyed glam pioneer, the enigmatic storyteller. But it was Bowie's ability to reinvent himself so vividly that captivated us again and again. Driven by boundless imagination, David Bowie was a multifaceted music icon, a social provocateur, a force in fashion, and a gifted actor whose unique personas and perspectives traveled with him through the decades. From the...
Full Bio