11 Songs, 34 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

This 1967 Young Rascals album (their third) sounds like a heavy soul band effortlessly playing pop—not a pop band attempting to play soulful R&B. As much as they’d mastered white soul and R&B, The Young Rascals had evolved under the songwriting of keyboardist Felix Cavaliere and singer Eddie Brigati. That’s evidenced here on the hit singles, which include the suitably titled “Groovin’,” the killer, brass-drenched “A Girl Like You,” and the slow-stinging (and often covered) “How Can I Be Sure.” By now they’d begun to explore West Coast psychedelia too (listen to the raga guitar drone in “Find Somebody”), while “You Better Run” blends scrappy psych with Southern soul to create a stunner of a rock ’n’ roll side (later covered by Pat Benatar). “If You Knew” is pure soul-pop bolstered by Gene Cornish’s cool Kinks-y riff and drummer Dino Danelli’s perpetual groove. There’s even folk with some Latin percussion (“I Don’t Love You Anymore”) and a wink at Motown (Stevie Wonder’s classic “A Place in the Sun”). It’s a wholly essential album for any fan of '60s music or rock ’n’ roll in general.

EDITORS’ NOTES

This 1967 Young Rascals album (their third) sounds like a heavy soul band effortlessly playing pop—not a pop band attempting to play soulful R&B. As much as they’d mastered white soul and R&B, The Young Rascals had evolved under the songwriting of keyboardist Felix Cavaliere and singer Eddie Brigati. That’s evidenced here on the hit singles, which include the suitably titled “Groovin’,” the killer, brass-drenched “A Girl Like You,” and the slow-stinging (and often covered) “How Can I Be Sure.” By now they’d begun to explore West Coast psychedelia too (listen to the raga guitar drone in “Find Somebody”), while “You Better Run” blends scrappy psych with Southern soul to create a stunner of a rock ’n’ roll side (later covered by Pat Benatar). “If You Knew” is pure soul-pop bolstered by Gene Cornish’s cool Kinks-y riff and drummer Dino Danelli’s perpetual groove. There’s even folk with some Latin percussion (“I Don’t Love You Anymore”) and a wink at Motown (Stevie Wonder’s classic “A Place in the Sun”). It’s a wholly essential album for any fan of '60s music or rock ’n’ roll in general.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.7 out of 5
24 Ratings
24 Ratings
SD5555X ,

It’s love

The Young Rascals were my very first favorite band. The first album I ever bought was “Collections.” I was 12 years old. I’m pretty sure this was the second album I ever bought. “A Girl Like You” was my favorite song for years. The magic starts with the opening piano, Felix’s vocals, then that beautiful chord change when he sings “about.” The B side of that single, “It’s Love,” is magical, too. As a young kid, I’d never heard something so moody and sophisticated. It turns out that the great jazz master Hubert Laws is playing the amazing flute that adds so much atmosphere to this tune. I do believe this song led me eventually to a love of jazz. A few years later, I saw Yes in concert, right after “The Yes Album” came out. The crowd loved them and demanded an encore. Much to my amazement, they did a terrific extended version of “It’s Love.” This whole album is full of magic. Still awesome today.

Mountainstudio ,

Essential

One of the best albums of the late 60's this has a place on my "desert island" playlist. While it is packed with hits, the album sequencing is perfect and plays well as an album.

Bikemcd ,

Great bicycle tunes!

Perfect music to listen to while riding 40 miles. Luv the Rascals!

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