15 Songs, 1 Hour 12 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

While her artsy experimentation demands to be heard in the context of her original studio albums if only to witness the evolution of her sound and ideas, Bjork’s freestyling pop thrown into the “Greatest Hits” blender offers things up in a populist format — the songs were picked by her fans — and allows you to hear her music inside out. While her solo success since leaving Iceland’s Sugarcubes has been strong, and certain key songs represent her well (“Human Behaviour,” “Army of Me,” “Hidden Place”), Bjork is not your traditional “singles” artist. This collection spans her first decade, 1992-2002, and provides a starting point that touches on each building block of her career, from the unexpected electronic pop nuance of her international debut solo album appropriately titled Debut (1990’s Gling-Glo was initially only available in Iceland) to the experimental and confident mid-career grooves of Post and Homogenic and onward to the quiet hypnosis of Vespertine. Despite a number of pop hooks, Bjork is never easy listening, but a challenging whirl of experience that deepens as her askew visions come into balance over time.

EDITORS’ NOTES

While her artsy experimentation demands to be heard in the context of her original studio albums if only to witness the evolution of her sound and ideas, Bjork’s freestyling pop thrown into the “Greatest Hits” blender offers things up in a populist format — the songs were picked by her fans — and allows you to hear her music inside out. While her solo success since leaving Iceland’s Sugarcubes has been strong, and certain key songs represent her well (“Human Behaviour,” “Army of Me,” “Hidden Place”), Bjork is not your traditional “singles” artist. This collection spans her first decade, 1992-2002, and provides a starting point that touches on each building block of her career, from the unexpected electronic pop nuance of her international debut solo album appropriately titled Debut (1990’s Gling-Glo was initially only available in Iceland) to the experimental and confident mid-career grooves of Post and Homogenic and onward to the quiet hypnosis of Vespertine. Despite a number of pop hooks, Bjork is never easy listening, but a challenging whirl of experience that deepens as her askew visions come into balance over time.

TITLE TIME

More By Björk

You May Also Like