12 Songs, 29 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

With its Rolling Stones-y vocal, oscillating guitar intro, and raga influence, the powerhouse title tune (penned by the outside songwriting duo Annette Tucker and Nancie Mantz) will forever keep this band and their debut album secured in '60s rock ’n’ roll history. The Electric Prunes weren’t oddballs like The Seeds, nor were they as creative as, say, Love, but this recording has a Southern California psych magic that is, at times, ethereal if not eerie, and it’s pop as all get out. For example, “Bangles” features an airy roundelay of dirty guitar runs, tempo changes, Motown-style beats, and an overtly baroque chorus, and the psyched-out surf and Eastern modes of “Sold to the Highest Bidder” is so relentless it becomes a sonic kaleidoscope. There’s also heavy orchestral pop (“Onie,” “The King Is in the Counting House”), let’s-break-curfew garage punk (“Get Me to the World on Time,” “Try Me on for Size”), dark pop with a jazzy twist (“Train for Tomorrow”), Brit Invasion lite (“About a Quarter to Nine”), and a finale that’s all cotton candy (“The Toonerville Trolley”).

EDITORS’ NOTES

With its Rolling Stones-y vocal, oscillating guitar intro, and raga influence, the powerhouse title tune (penned by the outside songwriting duo Annette Tucker and Nancie Mantz) will forever keep this band and their debut album secured in '60s rock ’n’ roll history. The Electric Prunes weren’t oddballs like The Seeds, nor were they as creative as, say, Love, but this recording has a Southern California psych magic that is, at times, ethereal if not eerie, and it’s pop as all get out. For example, “Bangles” features an airy roundelay of dirty guitar runs, tempo changes, Motown-style beats, and an overtly baroque chorus, and the psyched-out surf and Eastern modes of “Sold to the Highest Bidder” is so relentless it becomes a sonic kaleidoscope. There’s also heavy orchestral pop (“Onie,” “The King Is in the Counting House”), let’s-break-curfew garage punk (“Get Me to the World on Time,” “Try Me on for Size”), dark pop with a jazzy twist (“Train for Tomorrow”), Brit Invasion lite (“About a Quarter to Nine”), and a finale that’s all cotton candy (“The Toonerville Trolley”).

TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.3 out of 5
26 Ratings
26 Ratings
JDinhFA5 ,

I Had Too Much To Dream (Last Night)

This is a awsome Cd! I love the 1st song. It is the best song on the whole Cd. Anyone who likes 60's music must have the first song!

Navigations ,

Definitely worth a listen!

Despite the name (a little worse than, say, Ultimate Spinach), The Electric Prunes, like all good psychedelic bands of the 1960s (think Sopwith Camel, Jefferson Airplane, Grateful Dead, Sweetwater, Chocolate WatchBand, Quicksilver Messenger Service, Love, and so on), were serious about music. What distinguished The EP was a nice ability to capture nuances. That may seem strange, listening to the two big hit singles that came from this album ("I Had Too Much to Dream Last Night" and "Get Me to the World on Time"). But also on this album are very fine contemplative pieces: the love song "Onie” and then "Train for Tomorrow.” There are also other fine songs like “Bangles,” and “Are You Lovin’ Me More (But Enjoying It Less). Two songs that really show how perfectly subdued and nuanced The EP could be are what would be in the hands of a different band a loud rocker, “Luvin’,” and a delightful cover of an old Al Jolson song, “About a Quarter to Nine” (Really!!!). “Try Me On for Size” sounds a bit too much like an effort to sound like the Rolling Stones and “The Toonerville Trolley” is a not very successful effort to blend ‘20’s flapper music and modern rock. (The Association did it better: “Wasn’t It a Bit Like Now.”)

Masipag999 ,

Love this

I have listened to this album for thirty years now. Love every song. Their second album is almost as good too.

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