11 Songs, 42 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

For 1984's New Sensations Lou Reed cut his legendary guitarist Robert Quine from the sessions and threw his own limited guitar range into the mix, assembling an album tighter in punch if shorter in grasp. The Blue Mask, in particular, had been epic two years before. New Sensations found its excitement in the everyday, relying on the steadying rhythm section of bassist Fernando Saunders and drummer Fred Maher. From the opening pop-rock frolic of "I Love You, Suzanne," through the day-to-day neurosis that haunts "Endlessly Jealous" and the Stones-like "Turn to Me" over to the simple appreciations of "Doin' the Things That We Want To," Reed sounds comfortably normal for the first time in his career. He's accepted his limited vocal range without completely giving up on finding a hummable melody. "My Friend George" builds off a skeletal rhythm into a touching climax about sentimental friendships. "What Becomes a Legend Most," "Fly Into the Sun," and the title track maintain Reed's literary ear.

EDITORS’ NOTES

For 1984's New Sensations Lou Reed cut his legendary guitarist Robert Quine from the sessions and threw his own limited guitar range into the mix, assembling an album tighter in punch if shorter in grasp. The Blue Mask, in particular, had been epic two years before. New Sensations found its excitement in the everyday, relying on the steadying rhythm section of bassist Fernando Saunders and drummer Fred Maher. From the opening pop-rock frolic of "I Love You, Suzanne," through the day-to-day neurosis that haunts "Endlessly Jealous" and the Stones-like "Turn to Me" over to the simple appreciations of "Doin' the Things That We Want To," Reed sounds comfortably normal for the first time in his career. He's accepted his limited vocal range without completely giving up on finding a hummable melody. "My Friend George" builds off a skeletal rhythm into a touching climax about sentimental friendships. "What Becomes a Legend Most," "Fly Into the Sun," and the title track maintain Reed's literary ear.

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