11 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Brooklyn-based trio Hospitality keep the rough edges of their self-titled debut with a second album, 2014’s Trouble; it also keeps a youthful wonder toward melodies and the interworkings of a trio. Even a smooth, late-'70s new wave/pop number like “I Miss Your Bones” features all the elements right in front of your ears. The guitar solo sticks out for its naked aggression, but the bass lines practically click with the steady drums (like in the days of The Jam) and singer Amber Papini double-tracks her voice for a disorienting effect. The synth turns on for the weird and trippy minimalism of the Vampire Weekend–suggestible “Inauguration,” while the band goes for a full-blown plush stereo sound on “Rockets and Jets,” where guitars and keyboards vamp with sophistication. “It’s Not Serious” recalls the simple metrics of Brill Building pop, with the acoustic “Sunship” turning that pop toward the psychedelic ends of Mellotron and harmony. The all-acoustic and bare “Call Me After” finishes the proper album. The bonus track “Bet” extends the acoustic mood but with additional instrumental cover.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Brooklyn-based trio Hospitality keep the rough edges of their self-titled debut with a second album, 2014’s Trouble; it also keeps a youthful wonder toward melodies and the interworkings of a trio. Even a smooth, late-'70s new wave/pop number like “I Miss Your Bones” features all the elements right in front of your ears. The guitar solo sticks out for its naked aggression, but the bass lines practically click with the steady drums (like in the days of The Jam) and singer Amber Papini double-tracks her voice for a disorienting effect. The synth turns on for the weird and trippy minimalism of the Vampire Weekend–suggestible “Inauguration,” while the band goes for a full-blown plush stereo sound on “Rockets and Jets,” where guitars and keyboards vamp with sophistication. “It’s Not Serious” recalls the simple metrics of Brill Building pop, with the acoustic “Sunship” turning that pop toward the psychedelic ends of Mellotron and harmony. The all-acoustic and bare “Call Me After” finishes the proper album. The bonus track “Bet” extends the acoustic mood but with additional instrumental cover.

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About Hospitality

Hospitality are a Brooklyn-based indie pop outfit featuring songwriter and vocalist Amber Papini, Nathan Michel (who, at the time of joining the band, had several solo albums out on labels like Tigerbeat 6 and Tomlab), and Brian Betancourt. Hospitality garnered some attention in early 2009, notably from Pitchfork and Stereogum, on the strength of their untitled, self-released EP. Produced by Karl Blau, the disc showcased the band's spare, whimsical sound, one that nodded to acts like Arthur & Yu, Taken by Trees, and Camera Obscura. The group signed to Merge for its self-titled, full-length debut, which arrived in January 2012 and revisited some earlier material alongside new compositions inspired by youth, New York, and musings on the past and future. The trio's second album, Trouble, was produced by Michel and engineer Matt Boynton, and found Hospitality exploring darker lyrical themes with more care given to the songs' arrangements. It was released by Merge early in 2014. ~ Margaret Reges

ORIGIN
Brooklyn, NY
FORMED
2009

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