16 Songs, 38 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Quentin Tarantino is as much of a music geek as a film geek. He cares about songs so much that in Death Proof—his 2007 homage to grindhouse-style exploitation films of the '60s and '70s—a character explains the importance of “Hold Tight” by the '60s one-hit-wonder band Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich (featured here). Jack Nitzsche's “The Last Race” sets the mood perfectly, especially since it’s built on a foundation of sinister-sounding surf guitars—the kind that showed up in both Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Fiction. The rest of the soundtrack emphasizes the film’s homage to b-movie sleaze with sultry selections, including Smith’s reworking of the Burt Bacharach gem “Baby It’s You” and The Coasters’ “Down in Mexico”—which accompanies a memorable lapdance scene by the voluptuous Vanessa Ferlito. Anyone who's ever favored drum solos over guitar solos should skip straight to “Riot in Thunder Alley.”

EDITORS’ NOTES

Quentin Tarantino is as much of a music geek as a film geek. He cares about songs so much that in Death Proof—his 2007 homage to grindhouse-style exploitation films of the '60s and '70s—a character explains the importance of “Hold Tight” by the '60s one-hit-wonder band Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich (featured here). Jack Nitzsche's “The Last Race” sets the mood perfectly, especially since it’s built on a foundation of sinister-sounding surf guitars—the kind that showed up in both Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Fiction. The rest of the soundtrack emphasizes the film’s homage to b-movie sleaze with sultry selections, including Smith’s reworking of the Burt Bacharach gem “Baby It’s You” and The Coasters’ “Down in Mexico”—which accompanies a memorable lapdance scene by the voluptuous Vanessa Ferlito. Anyone who's ever favored drum solos over guitar solos should skip straight to “Riot in Thunder Alley.”

TITLE TIME
3:21