32 Songs, 1 Hour

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though he’s hardly a household name, most American moviegoers have been exposed to the unobtrusive but slightly off-kilter soundscapes of Bruno Coulais at some point during the ‘00s. After providing carefully considered, minimalist soundscapes for a wave of popular French films and documentaries, Coulais provided a career-changing score for the Oscar-nominated Winged Migration. Though Coulais’ score for Henry Selick’s Coraline boasts a few of the composer’s trademarks — minimal, Satie-like piano melodies and unease-inducing ambient tones — it is also something of a departure for the composer. Eerie, sweetly off-kilter performances from the Children’s Choir of Nice provide the main melodic thrust to a number of these tracks and recall Krzysztof Komeda’s iconic work on the Rosemary’s Baby soundtrack, with it’s superficially saccharine surface juxtaposed against genuinely unnerving melodic depths. Indeed, Komeda could be seen as the primary influence here, and the influence of that often satirical Polish composer gives Coraline an acid sense of humor that makes it one of Coulais’ most distinctive and engaging works.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though he’s hardly a household name, most American moviegoers have been exposed to the unobtrusive but slightly off-kilter soundscapes of Bruno Coulais at some point during the ‘00s. After providing carefully considered, minimalist soundscapes for a wave of popular French films and documentaries, Coulais provided a career-changing score for the Oscar-nominated Winged Migration. Though Coulais’ score for Henry Selick’s Coraline boasts a few of the composer’s trademarks — minimal, Satie-like piano melodies and unease-inducing ambient tones — it is also something of a departure for the composer. Eerie, sweetly off-kilter performances from the Children’s Choir of Nice provide the main melodic thrust to a number of these tracks and recall Krzysztof Komeda’s iconic work on the Rosemary’s Baby soundtrack, with it’s superficially saccharine surface juxtaposed against genuinely unnerving melodic depths. Indeed, Komeda could be seen as the primary influence here, and the influence of that often satirical Polish composer gives Coraline an acid sense of humor that makes it one of Coulais’ most distinctive and engaging works.

TITLE TIME

About Bruno Coulais

Born in 1954, Bruno Coulais is a French born film and television soundtrack composer whose first full-length work appeared in 1986 -- the score for the Sebastien Grall film La Femme Secrete. He kept to the television end of film scoring and composition for the next few years, and in 1996 he was to earn his first big marks for his work on the documentary Microcosmos, which won him the 1997 Cesar Award. With this success in tow, Coulais went on to the big screen, and some of the most popular French movies over the next few years featured his work, including the 2001 world-wide hit, Winged Migration. After this brief -- and successful -- foray into cinematics, Coulais went off on his own, composing a children's opera, and delving into collaborative efforts with Akhentaon and A Filetta. But films and television were not left behind completely, and by 2008 -- the year of Coulais' soundtrack to the film MR 73 -- Coulais added another 13 or so credits to his résumé. More followed in the coming years, including soundtracks for 2010's documentary Babies and Jean-Paul Salomé's drama The Chameleon in the same year. ~ Chris True

HOMETOWN
Paris, France
BORN
January 13, 1954

Songs

Albums

Listeners Also Played