9 Songs, 53 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Antlers, a Brooklyn-based indie-ethereal trio led by singer/songwriter Peter Silberman, find themselves drifting toward jazzy Prefab Spout territory for their fourth studio album, Familiars. Though Silberman has graciously accepted the help of additional bandmates Darby Cicci and Michael Lerner, he’s still largely in his own head with sounds that suggest a solitary figure musing past midnight. Cicci pays her own freight by adding vocals in key spots. Her sudden emergence during “Revisited,” a track already flirting with greatness, takes the song to another dimension that justifies its more than seven-minute length, while she invigorates “Parade” to the point of pushing it nearly uptempo. With just nine songs, each track is practically an epic itself, a perfect approach for music that requires time to unspool and expand into the night air. Horn arrangements further augment the sound and tilt toward jazz, without turning the somber vibe into anything ersatz. “Director” finds a touch of Talk Talk in its placid beauty.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Antlers, a Brooklyn-based indie-ethereal trio led by singer/songwriter Peter Silberman, find themselves drifting toward jazzy Prefab Spout territory for their fourth studio album, Familiars. Though Silberman has graciously accepted the help of additional bandmates Darby Cicci and Michael Lerner, he’s still largely in his own head with sounds that suggest a solitary figure musing past midnight. Cicci pays her own freight by adding vocals in key spots. Her sudden emergence during “Revisited,” a track already flirting with greatness, takes the song to another dimension that justifies its more than seven-minute length, while she invigorates “Parade” to the point of pushing it nearly uptempo. With just nine songs, each track is practically an epic itself, a perfect approach for music that requires time to unspool and expand into the night air. Horn arrangements further augment the sound and tilt toward jazz, without turning the somber vibe into anything ersatz. “Director” finds a touch of Talk Talk in its placid beauty.

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