9 Songs, 37 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Although it has long been overshadowed by works from his better-known bandmates Neil Young and Stephen Stills, David Crosby’s 1971 solo debut is beginning to receive its due as a vivid portrayal of post-hippie malaise. The sublimely sedated grooves of “Cowboy Movie” and “Laughing” are a clear continuation of the patented CSNY vibe, but with Crosby as ringleader the proceedings become hazier and hazier until we are left with the hypnotic wordless incantations of “Song With No Words (Tree With No Leaves).” At the time of its release the album was dismissed as aimless and pretentious, and those claims are not entirely unfounded. But over the years Crosby’s lone solo statement (he wouldn’t make another solo album until 1989) came to signify something more than marijuana ramblings. Like John Phillip’s Wolfking of L.A. and Gene Clark’s No Other, If I Could Only Remember My Name doesn’t sound so much like the party as the morning after. This is the sound of all those Woodstock vibes evaporating in a warm California breeze. It’s not “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes” but it is, in its own sad way, just as sweet.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Although it has long been overshadowed by works from his better-known bandmates Neil Young and Stephen Stills, David Crosby’s 1971 solo debut is beginning to receive its due as a vivid portrayal of post-hippie malaise. The sublimely sedated grooves of “Cowboy Movie” and “Laughing” are a clear continuation of the patented CSNY vibe, but with Crosby as ringleader the proceedings become hazier and hazier until we are left with the hypnotic wordless incantations of “Song With No Words (Tree With No Leaves).” At the time of its release the album was dismissed as aimless and pretentious, and those claims are not entirely unfounded. But over the years Crosby’s lone solo statement (he wouldn’t make another solo album until 1989) came to signify something more than marijuana ramblings. Like John Phillip’s Wolfking of L.A. and Gene Clark’s No Other, If I Could Only Remember My Name doesn’t sound so much like the party as the morning after. This is the sound of all those Woodstock vibes evaporating in a warm California breeze. It’s not “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes” but it is, in its own sad way, just as sweet.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
52 Ratings
52 Ratings
pgdoit ,

Closest thing to being there

If you want to experience the feelings and atmosphere of the time, these sessions are the closest to being there. Out of my 2100 vinyls and 120GB of digital this work is in the top 20.

Rockxv ,

This one is a phenom

First heard this album back in the early 70s high in the Rockies (two ways to interpret that BTW) and loved the slow paced and hauntingly beautiful theme and tone of this entire reportorial. If nothing else, listening to DC and co. brings back fond memories and a deep sense of of inner peace - great for late mid-age high BP as well as a provisioner of a sereneness necessary to calm the emotional effects of current political maelstroms and the current wave of attacks on personal liberties and the risE of Imperialistic government brought forth by the Obama regime. Yup, I am a former Hippie turned sane (Conservative).

Hop house ,

For Dead Fans

For all of you Jerry Garcia fans, He plays steel pedal guitar on the song "Laughing"

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