6 Songs, 1 Hour, 6 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Many 21st-century prog rock bands downplay their '70s roots, preferring to create an identity uncolored by close associations with Yes, Genesis, and the like. And while Glass Hammer have experimented with touches of everything from pop to metal since starting out in 1993, the arrival of singer Jon Davison and guitarist Alan Shikoh on 2010's If put the band definitively on an old-school symphonic rock course. Keyboardist Fred Schendel and bass/keyboard man Steve Babb had been the core of the band from the start. Davison and Shikoh not only helped solidify Glass Hammer's lineup; they enabled a full-scale embrace of the band's roots. On If's five tracks—mostly epic-length excursions—tricky time signatures, complex counterpoints, and dizzying polyrhythms are delivered, along with plenty of analog-sounding synth lines, airy vocals, and deftly melodic guitar riffs. If that sounds like a trip back to the glory days of prog, well, why not? And if any further proof of Glass Hammer's mastery of the form is required, consider the fact that Yes themselves tapped Davison as their new frontman in 2012.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Many 21st-century prog rock bands downplay their '70s roots, preferring to create an identity uncolored by close associations with Yes, Genesis, and the like. And while Glass Hammer have experimented with touches of everything from pop to metal since starting out in 1993, the arrival of singer Jon Davison and guitarist Alan Shikoh on 2010's If put the band definitively on an old-school symphonic rock course. Keyboardist Fred Schendel and bass/keyboard man Steve Babb had been the core of the band from the start. Davison and Shikoh not only helped solidify Glass Hammer's lineup; they enabled a full-scale embrace of the band's roots. On If's five tracks—mostly epic-length excursions—tricky time signatures, complex counterpoints, and dizzying polyrhythms are delivered, along with plenty of analog-sounding synth lines, airy vocals, and deftly melodic guitar riffs. If that sounds like a trip back to the glory days of prog, well, why not? And if any further proof of Glass Hammer's mastery of the form is required, consider the fact that Yes themselves tapped Davison as their new frontman in 2012.

TITLE TIME
11:45
9:13
4:31
6:52
10:28
24:03

Ratings and Reviews

4.5 out of 5

39 Ratings

39 Ratings

The recording is defective.

Xxyyhl

The sound files you get when you purchase the download have pops in them. They sound like a vinyl lp with static.

Great New Album By Yes- oops I mean GH

pai gow

I am really enjoying the newest effort from GH. Obviously there was a plan to sound just like YES and the new singer nails Jon Anderson perfectly. Congratulations again to Steve and Fred for their excellent performance and production skills.

Solid effort. A return to progressive rock.

Dnalrah

The album's roots go back to vintage Yes in the Fragile and Yes Album mold. The new singer bears a striking similarity to Jon Anderson. Occasionally an ELP type of reference will float through mix. An enjoyable album though not groundbreaking.

About Glass Hammer

Glass Hammer began in 1992 when Tennessee musicians Steve Babb and Fred Schendel got together and began writing for a progressive rock concept album. That album, Journey of the Dunadan, was released the following year. Since the two men were basically the entire lineup of the group and played all of the instruments on the album, they would need to recruit musicians to perform the material live. Schendel had played with a drummer named Walter Moore in his last group the Obvious. They brought him in to augment the live lineup. Michelle Young (who had sung on one song on the album) became keyboardist for this version of the group. In 1994 they recorded a second disc, Perelandra, with David Carter being added to the lineup during that recording. The CD was released the following year and shortly thereafter, Young left the group. The next Glass Hammer album, On to Evermore, was released in 1998 followed two years later by Chronometree. ~ Gary Hill

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