11 Songs, 51 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Such was the wildly imaginative brilliance of Let’s Eat Grandma’s 2016 debut, I, Gemini, that some refused to believe it was the work of two 17-year-old girls from England. “The worst [response] was: ‘There must be some guy behind this,’” Jenny Hollingworth told Britain’s The Times newspaper in June 2018. Still teenagers, Hollingworth and Rosa Walton shatter misogynistic and patronizing expectations even further with this follow-up. They continue to weave multiple genres into a beguiling alt-pop tapestry, where songs journey through excitingly unpredictable left turns and trap doors. This time though, the melodies are sharper and the rhythms more club-ready. The intervening years have also enriched their words and voices: They examine the frustrations of love with crackling emotion on “Falling into Me” and reach out to a lost soul on aching piano ballad “Ava.”

EDITORS’ NOTES

Such was the wildly imaginative brilliance of Let’s Eat Grandma’s 2016 debut, I, Gemini, that some refused to believe it was the work of two 17-year-old girls from England. “The worst [response] was: ‘There must be some guy behind this,’” Jenny Hollingworth told Britain’s The Times newspaper in June 2018. Still teenagers, Hollingworth and Rosa Walton shatter misogynistic and patronizing expectations even further with this follow-up. They continue to weave multiple genres into a beguiling alt-pop tapestry, where songs journey through excitingly unpredictable left turns and trap doors. This time though, the melodies are sharper and the rhythms more club-ready. The intervening years have also enriched their words and voices: They examine the frustrations of love with crackling emotion on “Falling into Me” and reach out to a lost soul on aching piano ballad “Ava.”

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