8 Songs, 59 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Compared to the organic folktronica of Jon Hopkins’ preceding strum ‘n’ bass album, Diamond Mine, 2013’s Immunity is a departure in both music style and sonic texture. The former built an imaginative balance from the contrasts of electronic soundscapes rubbing against the grain of wood and wire. But with Immunity, Hopkins’ yin and yang swirl sublimely. The opening song, “We Disappear,” somehow makes techno sound light and breezy. On paper, the stuttered beats, rusty percussion, and deep bass should sound angular and abrasive. But under Hopkins’ touch, the elements here combine to sooth the senses with a feel that’s similar to reclining in a leather seat in the first-class section of a 747. “Open Eye Signal” follows, with more downplayed rhythms and tones gently pulsing and droning alongside what sounds like brushes on a snare drum. “Breathe This Ear” returns us to a time in the mid-'90s when British shoegazers like Slowdive were collaborating with the ambient electro backdrops of Seefeel. “Collider” brings some innovation to this marriage with cleverly collaged samples of singer Lisa Elle (Dark Horses).

EDITORS’ NOTES

Compared to the organic folktronica of Jon Hopkins’ preceding strum ‘n’ bass album, Diamond Mine, 2013’s Immunity is a departure in both music style and sonic texture. The former built an imaginative balance from the contrasts of electronic soundscapes rubbing against the grain of wood and wire. But with Immunity, Hopkins’ yin and yang swirl sublimely. The opening song, “We Disappear,” somehow makes techno sound light and breezy. On paper, the stuttered beats, rusty percussion, and deep bass should sound angular and abrasive. But under Hopkins’ touch, the elements here combine to sooth the senses with a feel that’s similar to reclining in a leather seat in the first-class section of a 747. “Open Eye Signal” follows, with more downplayed rhythms and tones gently pulsing and droning alongside what sounds like brushes on a snare drum. “Breathe This Ear” returns us to a time in the mid-'90s when British shoegazers like Slowdive were collaborating with the ambient electro backdrops of Seefeel. “Collider” brings some innovation to this marriage with cleverly collaged samples of singer Lisa Elle (Dark Horses).

TITLE TIME
4:49
7:48
5:29
9:21
4:57
5:45
11:54
9:56

About Jon Hopkins

Jon Hopkins is an electronic producer who meticulously constructs lush arrangements, blending digital beats and soothing ambience. His unique, hypnotic style made him a sought-after producer in the pop world, and earned him credits on albums by Coldplay, Massive Attack, Brian Eno, and Herbie Hancock in the late 2000s. Starting out as a gifted child pianist, in his teen years he became interested in synthesized sounds and started making acid house and drum'n'bass on a four-track recorder using computer software. He signed to Just Music at the ripe age of 19 in 2001, and recorded his debut album, Opalescent, while working part-time as a studio session musician in Wembley. His next album, 2004's Contact Note, was slightly more cinematic in nature and gained the respect of Brian Eno, who recruited Hopkins to play keys on his 2005 comeback album, Another Day on Earth. Through Eno, Hopkins began working on Coldplay's Viva la Vida as a co-producer before he returned to his solo career to complete his 2009 album, Insides. In 2011, he collaborated with Scotland's King Creosote on the largely acoustic Diamond Mine, a set of songs that influenced Hopkins' second album, Immunity, which split the difference between energetic dance music and more reflective songs. Asleep Versions followed in 2014 with tranquil and vocal-heavy versions of tracks from Immunity. A volume for the LateNightTales mix series was released in 2015. ~ Jason Lymangrover

  • ORIGIN
    Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey, Eng
  • GENRE
    Electronic
  • BORN
    August 15, 1979

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