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Album Review

Dither, moe.'s first studio release since 1998's Tin Cans and Car Tires, found moe. exploring similar territory to Wilco's Summerteeth album, with a lesser degree of success. The songs themselves are curiously good, though moe.'s arrangements are perhaps too rooted in endless playing on the road, where the band spends most of its time. As such, extra instruments and production effects — pianos, filter sweeps, DJs, synthesizers, and more — often sound unfortunately tacked on. In places, though — such as the incredibly catchy Paul Simon-influenced "New York City" or the introduction to the bittersweet "Faker" — the group manages to transcend its limitations. While the sound is cluttered, it also finds two original voices emerging from the group: bassist Rob Derhak and, to a slightly lesser extent, guitarist Al Schnier.

Customer Reviews

Real Album Review

moe. at their best. "Captain America" starts Dither same way that "Stranger Than Fiction" starts Tin Cans and Car Tires: a pumping, catchy song that gets you moving. I have to say that "Faker" actually brought a tear to my eye. "The Ghost Of Ralph's Mom", or "TGORM" as some may call it, is by far one of the best rock songs ever written. If you don't believe me, take a listen. "...the more things change/the more they stay the same/the more things stay the same/the more I go insane..." has to be one of the best chorus lyrics out there. I could mention something about emerging singers, but, after a decade and many preceding albums, that would be foolish. Almost all the tracks could be radio hits if moe. wished to pursue that road. Yes, the album is "dressed up" a bit, but that's what separates albums from live shows. We all know that you don't go to shows to "see the album": what's the point? You hear the album at home. So why not use the studio for what you can? Album songs are a great launching point for new ideas. That being said, these songs take you into the stratusphere live. Dither is moe.'s most cohesive effort; all the songs seem like they were meant to be together. These are all pure moe. songs even though there's a mention of a Tom Petty influence (for one song) in the CD book. Even when you hear moe.'s cover of "In a Big Country" you'll forget the original. My favorite track (other than TGORM) is "Opium". It's a six-minute bluesy rocker that ends the album. All that there's to say is, " and fog/you've got me feelin' no pain..." A quick note: Yes, "Opium" IS only six minutes long. After the song ends there's roughly fourteen minutes(14:00) of dead silence followed by "Captain America". Yes, it IS like that on the album, but iTunes should have made the edit. Also, That should be a "G" not a "6" in "TGORM". "TGORM" is just short-hand for "The Ghost Of Ralph's Mom", thus the mentioning of Ralph in the liner notes.

Choose carefully

I am disappointed that the Opium song, which is only able to be added unless you buy the whole album, was over in 6 minutes. Where as, the song length is advertised as a 23+ minute song. There is almost a 13 minute silent period on this track. I was hoping it was the long version that is played on satellite radio these days. I'm feeling jipped. If you're buying this album just to hear Opium, choose wisely. Why is music so hard to harness these days?


just buy it. stop thinking, buy. moe.rons already know all about this album but for the rest of you future moe.rons, learn it, live it, love it. you will not be disapointed. STOP READING THIS AND BUY IT YA MORON.


Formed: 1991

Genre: Rock

Years Active: '90s, '00s, '10s

Rising from the dingy college bars of upstate New York, moe. carved a niche for themselves with a distinct blend of Americana, melodic turns, clever songwriting, and jam band ethics. The bandmates were born and raised in the industrial town of Utica, but it took matriculation at the University of Buffalo for moe. to finally coalesce. Founded in 1990 by bassist/vocalist Rob Derhak, guitarist/vocalist Chuck Garvey, and original drummer Ray Schwartz, the band toured the university's party circuit under...
Full Bio