16 Songs, 1 Hour, 13 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Christian singer/songwriter Preson Phillips plugs in and cranks up the volume on In Our Winters, an album that fortifies his acoustic folk-rooted sound with Southern rock elements to striking effect. Of course, there’s been a note of biblical urgency in this Tampa-based artist’s music from the start. Phillips has a knack for finding a visceral connection between man and Spirit, which makes his turn toward electric rock backup both appropriate and welcome. His rumbling, echo-bathed version of the traditional “Wayfaring Stranger,” as well as original tunes like “The Riverbed,” display real grit and muscle. Fresh versions of the previously recorded “Deuteronomy Six” and “Open for Me” find a deeper resonance in their worshipful lyrics. Even more compelling is “Lift Up the Gates,” a tune blending anger with exaltation that takes its core message from Psalm 24. As before, Phillips’ hard vocal twang and smoldering intensity bring to mind the sort of feverish testimonies Keith Green delivered back in the ‘70s. He infuses songs like “Lamb of God,” “Behold the Architect,” and “Come Down Father” with a wide-eyed enthusiasm tempered by scriptural seriousness.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Christian singer/songwriter Preson Phillips plugs in and cranks up the volume on In Our Winters, an album that fortifies his acoustic folk-rooted sound with Southern rock elements to striking effect. Of course, there’s been a note of biblical urgency in this Tampa-based artist’s music from the start. Phillips has a knack for finding a visceral connection between man and Spirit, which makes his turn toward electric rock backup both appropriate and welcome. His rumbling, echo-bathed version of the traditional “Wayfaring Stranger,” as well as original tunes like “The Riverbed,” display real grit and muscle. Fresh versions of the previously recorded “Deuteronomy Six” and “Open for Me” find a deeper resonance in their worshipful lyrics. Even more compelling is “Lift Up the Gates,” a tune blending anger with exaltation that takes its core message from Psalm 24. As before, Phillips’ hard vocal twang and smoldering intensity bring to mind the sort of feverish testimonies Keith Green delivered back in the ‘70s. He infuses songs like “Lamb of God,” “Behold the Architect,” and “Come Down Father” with a wide-eyed enthusiasm tempered by scriptural seriousness.

TITLE TIME
5:13
4:07
4:23
4:16
5:20
6:16
4:25
4:10
4:51
4:19
4:26
4:02
4:07
4:47
5:07
3:21

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