"U.K." by U.K. on iTunes

8 Songs

EDITORS’ NOTES

U.K.’s first album takes rhythmic inspiration from contemporary funk while firmly retaining the fusion of rock, classical, and jazz that characterized British prog in the mid-’70s. “In the Dead of Night” is all galloping stabs and stentorian organ, with regular sprays from Allan Holdsworth’s burning guitar, while the relatively calm and mournful “By the Light of Day” lays bohemian jazz fiddle against rolling synth. “Thirty Years” is half languid buildup, half herky-jerk fanfare, while “Nevermore” gleefully incorporates a disco strut into the band’s compositional arsenal.

EDITORS’ NOTES

U.K.’s first album takes rhythmic inspiration from contemporary funk while firmly retaining the fusion of rock, classical, and jazz that characterized British prog in the mid-’70s. “In the Dead of Night” is all galloping stabs and stentorian organ, with regular sprays from Allan Holdsworth’s burning guitar, while the relatively calm and mournful “By the Light of Day” lays bohemian jazz fiddle against rolling synth. “Thirty Years” is half languid buildup, half herky-jerk fanfare, while “Nevermore” gleefully incorporates a disco strut into the band’s compositional arsenal.

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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5

30 Ratings

Great!

Mac Badger,

This is a great 70's progressive sound and -In the dead of the night- CLASSIC-Love it!!

Ahead of its time

Edwoodk,

This is a notable example of a band too far ahead of its time to garner wide acceptance. John Wetton bass & vocals, Bill Bruford drums, Allan Holdsworth guitar & Eddie Jobson keyboards, violin are all powerhouse musicians; together they are almost too talented individually to be in one group. It was the era of disco, punk & the end of the "classic" rock era. They didn't exactly fit into any of these categories well but like all great art their work here is timeless and can be appreciated outside the context of what was cool or fashionable in its time.

About U.K.

Featuring members of Yes, King Crimson, Roxy Music, and Soft Machine, U.K. was one of the most prominent progressive rock supergroups of the late '70s. Various members of U.K. -- guitarist Allan Holdsworth, keyboardist/violinist Eddie Jobson, bassist/vocalist John Wetton, and drummer Bill Bruford -- had all played together in their previous bands, but when the group formed in 1977, it was the first time all of the musicians had played together. Although the lineup was unstable -- Holdsworth and Bruford left after one album, with former Frank Zappa drummer Terry Bozzio replacing Bruford -- and the group was short-lived, the band maintained a dedicated cult following years after their early-'80s breakup.

Prior to the formation of U.K., Bruford and Wetton had recently played together in King Crimson, and Holdsworth had played guitar on Bruford's debut album, 1978's Feels Good to Me. Shortly after the recording of Feels Good to Me, Bruford, Holdsworth, and Wetton formed U.K., adding former Roxy Music member Eddie Jobson to the lineup.

U.K. released their eponymous debut in 1978 and the album captured the attention of progressive rock and jazz fusion fans, as did the record's supporting tour. At the conclusion of the tour, Holdsworth and Bruford left the group to form Bruford, leaving keyboardist Jobson as the band's leader. U.K. didn't hire another guitarist, but they did have Terry Bozzio replace Bruford. The new lineup of U.K. released Danger Money in 1979 and followed the album with a tour. Once the tour was completed, the group broke up. The posthumous live album Night After Night was released shortly afterward. Following the disbandment of U.K., Eddie Jobson became a member of Jethro Tull, Terry Bozzio formed Missing Persons, and John Wetton formed Asia with fellow progressive rock stars Steve Howe, Carl Palmer, and Geoffrey Downes. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine

  • FORMED
    1977

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