11 Songs, 44 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Where many of Chris Knight’s country music contemporaries tend to muse on small town America with a Mayberry-esque nostalgia, Knight chooses to focus on the kinds of blue-collar struggles he experienced in his hometown of Slaughters, Kentucky. His eighth studio album kicks off with “In The Mean Time,” a gritty twang-rocker where acoustic guitars and auto-harp are contrasted with a Crazy Horse flavored distortion. Over this, Knight sings about how the destitute working man needs to turn toward homesteading and survivalist tactics when his own government is out to rob him. Those vocal harmonies in the chorus come courtesy of Buddy Miller who also sings in the following “Missing You,” another raw cut of Americana rock with Knight’s drawl howling in desperate torment over the breakup of vintage tube amps cranked loud. To reflect the economic anguish and hardscrabble times that Knight sings about, he enlisted producer Ray Kennedy who has done similar sounding mixes for Steve Earle and Reckless Kelly (among others). In the gripping title-track, Knight’s weathered rasp is accompanied by that of veteran John Prine.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Where many of Chris Knight’s country music contemporaries tend to muse on small town America with a Mayberry-esque nostalgia, Knight chooses to focus on the kinds of blue-collar struggles he experienced in his hometown of Slaughters, Kentucky. His eighth studio album kicks off with “In The Mean Time,” a gritty twang-rocker where acoustic guitars and auto-harp are contrasted with a Crazy Horse flavored distortion. Over this, Knight sings about how the destitute working man needs to turn toward homesteading and survivalist tactics when his own government is out to rob him. Those vocal harmonies in the chorus come courtesy of Buddy Miller who also sings in the following “Missing You,” another raw cut of Americana rock with Knight’s drawl howling in desperate torment over the breakup of vintage tube amps cranked loud. To reflect the economic anguish and hardscrabble times that Knight sings about, he enlisted producer Ray Kennedy who has done similar sounding mixes for Steve Earle and Reckless Kelly (among others). In the gripping title-track, Knight’s weathered rasp is accompanied by that of veteran John Prine.

TITLE TIME

About Chris Knight

Chris Knight is a singer/songwriter from the tiny mining town of Slaughters, KY, whose self-titled debut album invited comparisons to Steve Earle and John Prine. Knight started on his musical journey at just three years old when he requested a plastic guitar for Christmas. At 15, he became more serious when he began teaching himself dozens of John Prine songs on his older brother's guitar. After earning an agriculture degree from Western Kentucky University, Knight went to work in land reclamation, but in 1986 he heard Earle on the radio and decided to try his hand at writing songs.

After six years of perfecting his story songs about the downtrodden of small-town America, Knight came to Nashville and won a coveted spot on a songwriters' night at the Bluebird Cafe. Performing songs like "Framed," which would eventually wind up on his debut album, he caught the ear of Frank Liddell, who signed him to a publishing deal with Bluewater Music. Knight went back home and kept writing, and when Decca Records hired Liddell for an A&R position, Knight got a record deal. When Decca released his self-titled debut in 1997, Knight still lived in a house trailer on 90 acres in Slaughters. He has since become a popular name in Americana music, releasing four more albums: his 1998 self-titled sophomore effort, 2001's Pretty Good Guy, 2003's Jealous Kind, and 2006's Enough Rope. ~ Brian Wahlert

HOMETOWN
Slaughters, KY
GENRE
Country
BORN
June 24, 1960

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