8 Songs, 30 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

2001’s In Torment in Hell was the final recording Deicide made for Roadrunner, the label that had helped cement their reputation as antiheroes of American death metal. The title turned out to be accurate, as the making of the album was rife with conflict. Disputes between singer Glen Benton and guitarists Eric and Brian Hoffman left the group in disarray, and some songs reflect a frantic, rushed approach, as if they were written and recorded spontaneously, without prior planning. The sense of internal frustration becomes part of the album’s tone, especially in the toxic guitar effects of “In Torment in Hell” and “Child of God,” which emerge and expand over the riffs like some kind of poisonous gas. Despite the band’s turmoil, the entire album has an impressively engrossing sound. A song like “Vengeance Will Be Mine” could have easily become one of the band’s signature anthems. As it stands, the album left Deicide with a pair of immortal classics in the title track and “Lurking Among Us,” two displays of exhilarating cruelty.

EDITORS’ NOTES

2001’s In Torment in Hell was the final recording Deicide made for Roadrunner, the label that had helped cement their reputation as antiheroes of American death metal. The title turned out to be accurate, as the making of the album was rife with conflict. Disputes between singer Glen Benton and guitarists Eric and Brian Hoffman left the group in disarray, and some songs reflect a frantic, rushed approach, as if they were written and recorded spontaneously, without prior planning. The sense of internal frustration becomes part of the album’s tone, especially in the toxic guitar effects of “In Torment in Hell” and “Child of God,” which emerge and expand over the riffs like some kind of poisonous gas. Despite the band’s turmoil, the entire album has an impressively engrossing sound. A song like “Vengeance Will Be Mine” could have easily become one of the band’s signature anthems. As it stands, the album left Deicide with a pair of immortal classics in the title track and “Lurking Among Us,” two displays of exhilarating cruelty.

TITLE TIME

About Deicide

Controversy has plagued Florida-based quartet Deicide. During their first tour in 1992, the band was severely criticized for their statements in favor of animal sacrifices. Their Stockholm, Sweden, concert was canceled after four songs when a bomb was discovered on-stage. Led by vocalist/bass player Glen Benton, Deicide has delivered some of the goriest sounds to ever emanate from the Sunshine State. Their songs continue to radiate with the brutal attack of satanic death metal.

Formed in 1987, Deicide quickly released two demos -- Feasting the Beast in 1987 and Sacrificial in 1989 -- under the name Amon. Signing with Roadrunner Records, they changed their name and released their first full-length CD, featuring all six demo tracks, in 1990. They didn't tour until releasing their second album, Legion, in 1992. A string of albums followed, including Amon: Feasting the Beast (1993), Once Upon the Cross (1995), Serpents of the Light (1997), the live When Satan Lives (1998), Insineratehymn (2000), In Torment, In Hell (2001), Scars of the Crucifix (2004), and Stench of Redemption (2006). Deicide's Till Death Do Us Part was released on Earache Records in April 2008. ~ Craig Harris

GENRE
Rock
FORMED
1987

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