43 Songs, 2 Hours 32 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

If Nevermind's polished sound was a glorious blaze in a candle factory, In Utero's was a grease fire on a blackened stove. Deliberately tweaking the machinery of the grunge industry, the trio recorded the follow-up to their multi-platinum triumph with indie godhead Steve Albini, who was all too happy to give them a sound almost as alienating as the one he'd brought to PJ Harvey's Rid of Me. Kurt Cobain had a case of squawling dissatisfaction to unload, and from "Scentless Apprentice" to "Frances Farmer Will Have Her Revenge on Seattle," he soaked the floors with it. A more complex set of songs than even the bunch that made Cobain a superstar, these also covered the bases from regret ("All Apologies") to incoherence ("Tourette's") and even—what's this?—a grudging pleasure ("Dumb"). In Utero is final proof that a record can't expel all the poison from an artist's system. If it somehow could have, Cobain would certainly be with us today.

Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

If Nevermind's polished sound was a glorious blaze in a candle factory, In Utero's was a grease fire on a blackened stove. Deliberately tweaking the machinery of the grunge industry, the trio recorded the follow-up to their multi-platinum triumph with indie godhead Steve Albini, who was all too happy to give them a sound almost as alienating as the one he'd brought to PJ Harvey's Rid of Me. Kurt Cobain had a case of squawling dissatisfaction to unload, and from "Scentless Apprentice" to "Frances Farmer Will Have Her Revenge on Seattle," he soaked the floors with it. A more complex set of songs than even the bunch that made Cobain a superstar, these also covered the bases from regret ("All Apologies") to incoherence ("Tourette's") and even—what's this?—a grudging pleasure ("Dumb"). In Utero is final proof that a record can't expel all the poison from an artist's system. If it somehow could have, Cobain would certainly be with us today.

Mastered for iTunes
TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.3 out of 5
43 Ratings
43 Ratings
Droceankiddd ,

The simple truth

The simple truth is what Cobain wanted was the albini mixes.
But they were leaked, the record company thought it was crap, "unlistenable," and started to lean on Kurt.
Eventually he caved and now you are looking at buying something so far removed from the original vision it's tragic.
If Cobain were alive today, I know he'd have loved for the album to be released as initially intentioned, with the original rough but tough as nails "albini" mixes.
But here we only get one song from albini, and two ridiculously unneeded remastering jobs full of pomp and pageantry, the likes of which Kurt wanted to stay off this album.
Songs are still good. But don't buy into the swill. Have so many people forgotten what nirvana stood for? Did Kurt's suicide forever obscure the truth? Journals published, in Utero raped by pro tools, I know an "as intended by Kurt" In Utero will never come.
I bet it's hard for people to imagine how extreme and noisy and chaotic this album was before new metal and everything commercial after,
but it was thrilling. It was like nothing before it. And it would be nice to have it as the artists wanted it. If you're a newcomer to nirvana, just buy the original mixes. Do a little research if you cherry pick between box sets and rereleases (mostly the box set from 2004 "with the lights out") you can get all the good unreleased songs, and you don't need to pay 40$ to the people who told Kurt that this album was too "unlistenable."
Shame and pestilence upon all marketing Geffen re-packagers.

BarfBag27andahalf ,

Kurt's work

Kurt Cobain was the best lyricist of the 90s and arguably of all time. This album shows why.

fiendfather ,

The Simple Truth

I couldn't have said it better that this guy did. Read his review. I know Nirvana is coming back into style but do your do diligence and find the original mixes. Learn what Kurt was about and why he acted as he did. He changed the world by being different and this is just a marketing ploy to get you to make the people he hated richer. RIP Kurt. We miss your brutal honesty

About Nirvana

Even now, years after you first felt its edges, the chorus of “Smells Like Teen Spirit” still sounds too dangerous—too loud, too ugly, too upset—for any mainstream. And yet, Nirvana’s 1991 single didn’t just mark an unlikely breakthrough for the Seattle trio, it upended popular culture in ways we’ve haven’t seen since. Punk became pop, grunge became global vernacular, industry walls became rubble, and frontman Kurt Cobain became the reluctant voice of a generation in need of catharsis, all seemingly overnight. Though his 1994 suicide would see the band dissolve just as abruptly as they’d arrived, their story is now rock’n’roll parable and their influence still felt—as punks, icons, Hall of Famers, purveyors of haunting melody and often terrifying noise.

ORIGIN
Aberdeen, WA
FORMED
1987

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