9 Songs, 38 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Lydia Loveless' sophomore release, Indestructible Machine, sees the alt-country spitfire exploding into a country-punk fireball. “Bad Way To Go” makes clear the road ahead. There are more barbed-wire guitars, more songs with Loveless spewing what’s on her mind with the color of a gin-soaked sailor on leave, and truckloads more of her redhaired fury. Loveless easily earns the “punk” half of the country-punk label here (she did do some time as a youth the punk scene of Columbus, Ohio). Songs like “Can’t Change Me” and “More Like Them” are full of big, chugging guitars and aggressive percussion; “Jesus Was a Wino” and “Do Right” surge on amphetamine snares and nervy banjo. When Loveless isn’t telling funny stories (the fictional “Steve Earle” is a hoot) or delivering a verbal bitch-slap with her powerhouse voice, she’s lamenting another hangover or her bad behavior. “My mouth is like a sinking boat / I keep pouring words out, hopin’ I can keep afloat,” she almost apologizes. We forgive you, Lydia. Carry on.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Lydia Loveless' sophomore release, Indestructible Machine, sees the alt-country spitfire exploding into a country-punk fireball. “Bad Way To Go” makes clear the road ahead. There are more barbed-wire guitars, more songs with Loveless spewing what’s on her mind with the color of a gin-soaked sailor on leave, and truckloads more of her redhaired fury. Loveless easily earns the “punk” half of the country-punk label here (she did do some time as a youth the punk scene of Columbus, Ohio). Songs like “Can’t Change Me” and “More Like Them” are full of big, chugging guitars and aggressive percussion; “Jesus Was a Wino” and “Do Right” surge on amphetamine snares and nervy banjo. When Loveless isn’t telling funny stories (the fictional “Steve Earle” is a hoot) or delivering a verbal bitch-slap with her powerhouse voice, she’s lamenting another hangover or her bad behavior. “My mouth is like a sinking boat / I keep pouring words out, hopin’ I can keep afloat,” she almost apologizes. We forgive you, Lydia. Carry on.

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Customer Reviews

5 out of 5

37 Ratings

Anti Swift

Voodoo Child ,

Lydia Loveless is everything female country artists arn't these days, she's whiskey soaked, foul mouthed and intelligent. This is the album that would make Taylor Swift run screaming for the hills. The tales here are about drunken nights, foggy mornings, heartbreak and one of America's greatest songwriters who just won't leave her alone ("Steve Earle"). The sound on this album is classic alt country, think the Old 97's in their prime fronted by a woman. Lydia's voice is a knock out, and to think that she is capable of work this strong at 21 shows much promise. Once again Bloodshot Records have hit a home run. Do yourself a favor and check this one out, you won't regret it!

Love this music...

jyo_tirmaya,

Lydia Loveless sings songs with a mix of country and punk. These are good songs - gems! You'll wanna be listenin' to this one at your next hoe-down! Be one of the first to turn your friends on to Lydia Loveless. They will love you for it!!! And I gotta feelin' that Ms. Loveless won't be love-less for very long!

About Lydia Loveless

Firebrand alt-country singer Lydia Loveless combines the honky tonk sound and style of classic country stars like Loretta Lynn and Patsy Cline with the no-quarter attitude and spunk of punk rock divas such as Exene Cervenka and Carla Bozulich. Lydia Loveless was born in Coschocton, Ohio in 1990; she was raised on a farm, but her father was also a music fan who booked bands at a local bar, and Lydia became accustomed early on to seeing bands play and discovering an out-of-town act asleep on the living-room floor in the morning. By the time Loveless was 13, she had taken up songwriting and was doing shows with local bands, playing a combination of rootsy country and punk-influenced rock & roll. After relocating to Columbus, Ohio, Loveless fronted a pop/rock band with her sisters called Carson Drew, but the combo broke up not long after the release of their 2006 album, Under the Table, and Loveless began concentrating on her solo career, forming a backing band with her dad on drums. In 2010, Loveless self-released her first solo album, The Only Man, which earned her rave reviews from the alt-country music media, and as she began work on a follow-up EP, she was contacted by respected insurgent country label Bloodshot Records, which promptly signed Loveless to a record deal.

At the label's behest, Loveless expanded the EP to an album, and her first Bloodshot release, Indestructible Machine, was released in September 2011. After the album arrived in stores, Loveless and her band hit the road hard, touring extensively in the United States, Canada, and Europe. In 2013, Loveless began writing material for a third album, but shortly after the sessions for the full-length were completed, Loveless had a burst of inspiration that led to her writing and recording a hard-rocking five-song EP about the ups and downs of relationships. Titled Boy Crazy, the EP was released as a stopgap in late 2013, while the album, the confident and eclectic Somewhere Else, appeared in February 2014. Somewhere Else received enthusiastic reviews, and writer and punk rock icon Richard Hell said of Loveless, "Lydia is the only singer/songwriter the power of whose music and voice consistently makes me cry." Filmmaker Gorman Bechard began work on a documentary about her life and music, Who Is Lydia Loveless?, which debuted on the film festival circuit in the fall of 2016. And in August 2016, Loveless released her much-anticipated fourth album, Real. ~ Mark Deming

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