10 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Infinity Overhead marks Minus the Bear’s return to the muscular sound that defined the band a decade ago. MTB delivers plenty of bracing riffage, veering from brutal metalhead chords to the distinctive string-tapping effects that have become a band signature. Beyond reclaiming old ground, Infinity Overhead shows forward motion in the maturity of its songwriting. Whether he’s searching for a closer human connection in “Steel and Blood,” dissecting a troubled relationship in “Lonely Gun,” or digging the wonders of the cosmos in “Diamond Lighting,” lead singer Jake Snider conveys subtle emotions with a cool yet yearning touch. The dreamy balladry of “Heaven Is a Ghost Town” gives him an expansive space to ponder the afterlife amid murmuring synthesizers and lustrous strings. As an ensemble, MTB sounds fully rejuvenated as it moves from the R&B-inflected “Lies and Eyes” into the nervously melodic “Listing” and the sleekly propulsive “Zeros.” The closing track, “Cold Company,” reveals the band’s progressive rock affinities with torrential guitar notes and hard-charging dynamics.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Infinity Overhead marks Minus the Bear’s return to the muscular sound that defined the band a decade ago. MTB delivers plenty of bracing riffage, veering from brutal metalhead chords to the distinctive string-tapping effects that have become a band signature. Beyond reclaiming old ground, Infinity Overhead shows forward motion in the maturity of its songwriting. Whether he’s searching for a closer human connection in “Steel and Blood,” dissecting a troubled relationship in “Lonely Gun,” or digging the wonders of the cosmos in “Diamond Lighting,” lead singer Jake Snider conveys subtle emotions with a cool yet yearning touch. The dreamy balladry of “Heaven Is a Ghost Town” gives him an expansive space to ponder the afterlife amid murmuring synthesizers and lustrous strings. As an ensemble, MTB sounds fully rejuvenated as it moves from the R&B-inflected “Lies and Eyes” into the nervously melodic “Listing” and the sleekly propulsive “Zeros.” The closing track, “Cold Company,” reveals the band’s progressive rock affinities with torrential guitar notes and hard-charging dynamics.

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