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Inside the Kremlin

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Album Review

Ravi Shankar, the figurehead of world music, was invited in 1988 to work with Russian musicians on a concert to mark the end of an Indian Festival in the Soviet Union. This recording was made on July seventh of that year, with over 140 musicians present: Shankar's Indian Ensemble, the Russian Folk Ensemble, the Government Chorus of Ministry of Culture of USSR, and the chamber orchestra of the Moscow Philharmonic. Shankar composed all seven of the pieces here as a melding of the musics of India and Russia. "Prarambh," the opening piece, is an ethereal sort of sound created by the amalgamation of Indian and Russian instruments both playing ragas. "Shanti-Mantra" is based on Raga Devagiri Bilawal, as well as the Shanta Ras, from the Bharatanatyasastra (oldest work of Indian music theory), and is performed by both the Indian vocalists, as well as the Government Choir. Three ragas are based on Raga Hemavati, Raga Kirwani, and Raga Basant Mukhari, and are performed solely by the Moscow Philharmonic musicians. "Tarana" makes use of a Punjab form of singing that utilizes nonsense syllables to great effects of rhythmic wonder. "Sandhya Raga," based on Raga Yaman Kalyan, is "basic" Indian classical music, without any Russian additions, and "Bahu-Rang" is the finale of the concert. It is based on Raga Mishra Pilu and has five movements, the first being instrumental, the second being call and response with the drums, the third being improvised thumri singing, and the fourth element being a folk portion that leads to the climax, a song "Unity of Friendship and Love" by Shankar. While the synthesis of Indian and Russian musics could leave a listener wary before hearing the album, Shankar remained almost solely with Indian music, though the performers may have been Russian. The album is definitely worthwhile, as the backing Russian chorus can add something to the music, though leaving Indian classical solely in the hands of foreigners can be a dangerous matter, as is proven on three ragas. Throughout, though, it's quite a nice album, worthy of the Shankar name being placed upon it.

Customer Reviews

Where the twain meet

Here is about as perfect a blend of classical Indian and classical European music as one could imagine. Don't be intimidated by "Bahu-Rang", the longest track- it just keeps getting better as it shifts gears to its climax.

Biography

Born: April 7, 1920 in Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India

Genre: World

Years Active: '30s, '40s, '50s, '60s, '70s, '80s, '90s, '00s

Rabindra Shankar Chowdery, aka Ravi Shankar, was born on April 7, 1920, in Varanasi, India, into a well-off orthodox Brahmin family. His father, ShyÆm Shankar, was employed as a diwan (minister) by the Maharajah of Jhalawar. By the age of 13, Ravi Shankar was going along on every tour of his brother Uday Shankar's Compaigne de Danse et Musique Hindou (Company of Hindu Dance and Music). At the All-Bengali Music Conference in December 1934, he met the multi-instrumentalist Allauddin Khan. Precisely...
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Inside the Kremlin, Ravi Shankar
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