11 Songs, 46 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Polished, lushly produced electro-rock makes Integrity Blues a sleek contrast to 2013’s straight-to-tape Damage. After opening the record with the angelic backing vocals and layered guitars of “You with Me,” the band alternates moments of familiarity (“You Are Free” could be a B-Side from Clarity) with moody experimentation. The later is thanks to producer Justin Meldal-Johnsen (Paramore, NIN), whose touch can be heard on adventurous tracks like “Pass the Baby,” which ends with in a blaze of Sabbath-esque guitars.

Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Polished, lushly produced electro-rock makes Integrity Blues a sleek contrast to 2013’s straight-to-tape Damage. After opening the record with the angelic backing vocals and layered guitars of “You with Me,” the band alternates moments of familiarity (“You Are Free” could be a B-Side from Clarity) with moody experimentation. The later is thanks to producer Justin Meldal-Johnsen (Paramore, NIN), whose touch can be heard on adventurous tracks like “Pass the Baby,” which ends with in a blaze of Sabbath-esque guitars.

Mastered for iTunes
TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.7 out of 5
134 Ratings
134 Ratings
XoLegend ,

Love this Album

I absolutely fell in love with the sound and the lyrics. Jimmy Eat World will always be my favorite rock band.

RMnynys ,

A-mazing.

No words can express the incandescent feelings this albums sparks within your soul. "Sure and Certain" will take you back in time. "Pol Roger" will take you to place you never knew existed. Pure and honest with a twinge of sadness- Integrity Blues encompasses the name perfectly for this album.

Kdove98 ,

Shocked and Amzed

I have almost every JEW (lol never realized their initials spelled that) and I've been in love with their sound since the days when The Middle and Sweetness ruled rock and pop radio. I didn't love Damaged and thus skipped buying it and didn't listen to this album until months after it dropped. Mistake, big mistake. Every song has feeling and purpose. There are no numb, phone it in tracks. The lyrics are broad and somber, as you may expect from this band. With just one listen Ive been transported back to my teens when I first put Futures in my CD player (can't believe they even existed now) and walked around listening to the insane dichotomy of JEWs sad lyrics but upbeat baselines. I'm really glad there's still some rock music out there to listen to and I hope the band can continue on in these tough times for rockers and incorporate new sounds as much as they like without getting a total facelift then denying the surgery like some acts. Great album, guys. A lot to be proud of here.

More By Jimmy Eat World

You May Also Like