10 Songs, 45 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Interpol’s self-titled fourth album puts them back in the independent realm where they made their name. Whereas the previous Our Love to Admire sounded like a major-label album – grand and garish with lots of pomp and circumstance – this release scales things back. They sharpen their guitars on the surprisingly sparse single “Lights” and find much to grind against in their post-apocalyptic ways. The echo and reverb remains plenty heavy and the angst is spotted with glittery, jittery rhythms and panicked vocals. “Success” and “Memory Serves” start things with a hesitant jubilance drifting over the proceedings. “Barricade” breaks out from the pack while “Always Malaise (The Man I Am)” winds down into a gloomy pond. Other tracks like “Try It On,” “All of the Ways” and “The Undoing” dive deeper into their own rarefied type of darkness.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Interpol’s self-titled fourth album puts them back in the independent realm where they made their name. Whereas the previous Our Love to Admire sounded like a major-label album – grand and garish with lots of pomp and circumstance – this release scales things back. They sharpen their guitars on the surprisingly sparse single “Lights” and find much to grind against in their post-apocalyptic ways. The echo and reverb remains plenty heavy and the angst is spotted with glittery, jittery rhythms and panicked vocals. “Success” and “Memory Serves” start things with a hesitant jubilance drifting over the proceedings. “Barricade” breaks out from the pack while “Always Malaise (The Man I Am)” winds down into a gloomy pond. Other tracks like “Try It On,” “All of the Ways” and “The Undoing” dive deeper into their own rarefied type of darkness.

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Customer Reviews

4 out of 5

556 Ratings

3 years and this is it? 8 /

Ramos21J,

I'm a huge Interpol fan since 02'. Have a huge tattoo of their symbol on my arm to prove it but it hurts me so much to say that this album is mediocre. I can save 3 songs that were great but the rest had nothing that could be considered true Interpol magic. No one is expecting a TOBT 2 and it's great to experiment but this comes short to what Interpol are truly capable. I'll never stop being a lifelong fan but in 3 years is this what they give us? I'm disappointed. I honestly believe that the band is also disappointed with this album. They're back with matador records and I think the next album will b greater. Thank You Interpol still for everything!!!

It grew on me.

Dustin Mason,

First listen was abysmal for me and severely depressing. It wasn't until I listened through again...and again...that it grew on me. I love it, but I do miss that old Interpol sound. And Carlos D. =(

There was a point in time when I could play my iPod and NOT skip an Interpol song because every single one was worth listening to no matter how many times it had already been listened to. That was until Our Love to Admire and the self-title came out. I'll probably skip Crimewaves (the bonus song) to no end. It was too experimental for Interpol. And not in a good experimental Animal Collective way.

Always Malaise happens to be fabulous though!

I still love you, Interpol. Forever and ever! <3

About Interpol

One of the leading post-punk revivalists of the 2000s and 2010s, Interpol took their cues from Joy Division and the Chameleons, fashioning a darkly atmospheric sound helmed by intricate guitars and Paul Banks' somber baritone. The group also had a striking visual presence marked by the members' fondness for suits, which only strengthened their stately, British-influenced appeal. Nevertheless, the band remained rooted in America, where guitarist Daniel Kessler and drummer Greg Drudy first struck up a musical partnership while attending New York University. Carlos Dengler, another NYU student who had previously played guitar, joined as the group's bassist -- and by sheer coincidence, Kessler later bumped into Banks, a guitarist/vocalist whom Kessler had spent time with in France. Having settled on an initial lineup, Interpol became a fully active band in 1998 and began issuing a series of eight-track recordings. After the band's first gigs in early 2000, Drudy vacated his position and was replaced by drummer Sam Fogarino.

Regular appearances at New York venues like Brownie's and the Mercury Lounge helped endear Interpol to local audiences. Meanwhile, a brief U.K. tour in April 2001 was punctuated by a radio session for John Peel's BBC program, which expanded the band's audience overseas. The year 2001 also saw the band releasing its third EP, Precipitate, and appearing on the compilation album This Is Next Year, a double-disc set of Brooklyn-area acts. Matador Records signed the band in early 2002; by the end of the year, the independent label had issued both a three-song single and the band's debut LP, Turn on the Bright Lights. The album turned Interpol into a successful indie rock act, providing further proof that New York City had become a hub of marketable post-punk revivalism in the early 21st century.

Extensive touring followed, including international dates and television appearances. The band also opened for the Cure as part of that band's Curiosa Festival; soon after, Interpol released their second album, 2004's Antics. Three songs entered the Top 40 charts in the U.K., where the record later went gold. Following a major-label upgrade to the roster of Capitol Records, Interpol returned in 2007 with Our Love to Admire. Along with their Interpol duties, the band's members kept busy with other projects: Fogarino joined forces with Swervedriver's Adam Franklin as the Setting Suns (who later changed their name to Magnetic Morning), while Banks embarked on a solo career as Julian Plenti, releasing the 2009 album Julian Plenti Is Skyscraper. Dengler ventured into writing film scores. The bandmembers began recording their fourth album in early 2009, and in spring 2010, it was announced that Dengler was leaving Interpol; around that time, the band self-released the single "Lights." Dave Pajo was announced as the touring bassist for the group's shows with U2 in Europe that summer.

Interpol, which marked the band's return to Matador, arrived in September 2010. Following the tour for that album, the bandmembers announced an extended hiatus to "refresh" as well as to concentrate on their solo projects. These included Banks' solo material under the Julian Plenti moniker (2012's Julian Plenti Lives... EP) and his own name (his second album Banks, also from 2012), and Fogarino's EmptyMansions project, a collaboration with the Jesus Lizard's Duane Denison that issued 2013's snakes/vulture/sulfate. For 2014's back-to-basics fifth album, El Pintor (an anagram of Interpol), frontman Banks took over bass duties while touring member Brandon Curtis played keyboards. ~ Andy Kellman & Andrew Leahey

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