12 Songs, 54 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

From the record title to the snarled lyrics, Roger Waters is clearly not content. His sumptuous, languorous post-rock mixes through gruff interjections about the state of the world. Waters channels Pink Floyd’s greasy funk in “Smell the Roses” and even their sense of epic grandeur in “The Last Refugee,” given an immaculate buff by producer Nigel Godrich. He’s at his malevolent best playing the exasperated old coot, either taking on God’s mistakes in the stately “Déjà Vu” or cursing up a storm in “Broken Bones.”

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics. Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

From the record title to the snarled lyrics, Roger Waters is clearly not content. His sumptuous, languorous post-rock mixes through gruff interjections about the state of the world. Waters channels Pink Floyd’s greasy funk in “Smell the Roses” and even their sense of epic grandeur in “The Last Refugee,” given an immaculate buff by producer Nigel Godrich. He’s at his malevolent best playing the exasperated old coot, either taking on God’s mistakes in the stately “Déjà Vu” or cursing up a storm in “Broken Bones.”

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics. Mastered for iTunes
TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

3.9 out of 5
280 Ratings
280 Ratings
Todd the builder ,

Great work !

Almost a continuation of Amused To Death, some people might be disappointed with the lack of guitar solos. Those people are missing some real Great music. The music is largely hidden behind the lyrics, in other words he doesn’t stop singing or playing sound effects to let you hear the intricacies of the music. He gives it to you all at once and it’s amazing but the casual listener will miss out. Like with most of waters work you have to listen to every sound there is not a single sound on the album but is not intentionally there. When his voice cracks, his voice cracks intentionally, it’s part of the mood of the song and the album. Likewise when you hear a snippet of music from an earlier album, it’s not Waters reusing old material. It’s Waters reminding listeners of the concept covered in that earlier work. It’s pure Genius he manages to convey entire concepts with a few well placed notes! It’s an incredible idea as far as I know a completely new idea, and very well executed!

Sickofthecomplaining ,

It's a new Waters album but...

This would have not surprised me had it been the first album after Waters broke from Pink Floyd, but after listening to his other three albums (four counting The Final Cut) extensively (Radio Chaos hasn't really aged well though), this just does not seem like a progression of the Roger Waters sound. It really sounds like Pink Floyd minus the influence and spark that Wright and Gilmore gave (not trying to cut out Nick Mason, but he was not a huge creative driving force in the band like the others imho). I feel some of this may have to do with the production of the album. Why hire a man who was critical of your earlier work when it was so successful? Also on the production side, putting more focus on Waters' vocals while stripping down the music is probably not the greatest idea considering Waters' vocals are aging. While that sound has worked for many artists (Leonard Cohen, Johnny Cash, etc) it does not work here especcially with how bare bones they went with the vocals: no reverb, echo, or anything for the most part thorughout the album. A lot of rehashed Pink Floyd riffs and straight up rip offs just makes it all sould so...over. I love Floyd and I love Waters' music, but this is just a been there done that sooo much better before. Even his angst sounds weak and forced. OK album but on the entirety of the "Floyd Family Tree" of albums, this is down the list a long ways.

Wendyrocks91 ,

Best rock album since the 90's.

Picture That is the track of the century. Never heard anything like it. This album made me take an interest in history too, which is definitely not for fools. ;)

About Roger Waters

As the driving force behind Pink Floyd in the '70s and early '80s, Roger Waters helmed a series of searching, high-concept albums that reimagined rock as a force of almost symphonic stature, exploring themes of societal alienation (The Wall), class consciousness (Animals), and existence itself (Dark Side of the Moon). Songs like "Comfortably Numb" and "Another Brick in the Wall" braided the band's protestant spirit with science fiction’s dystopic slant. But the Surrey, UK-born singer, songwriter, and bassist didn’t just help expand rock's conceptual vocabulary: Under him, Pink Floyd became one of the first major groups to incorporate synthesizers and sound effects, extending The Beatles’ experiments with tape collage to new technological frontiers. His vision doesn’t end at music. Staunchly anti-establishment, Waters also embodies the figure of artist-as-activist, raising awareness and funds for causes as far-reaching as malaria, climate change, disaster relief, and Palestinian rights. In turn, he has influenced everyone from fellow progressive rock icons Rush to The Flaming Lips and Radiohead—Floyd disciples who turned grand philosophical questions into anthems of substance.

HOMETOWN
Great Bookham, Cambridge, England
GENRE
Rock
BORN
September 6, 1943

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