15 Songs, 1 Hour

EDITORS’ NOTES

Bob Dylan appeared in the music world at a time when mono was the standard commercial format, with Stereo being a novel afterthought. Therefore, his early records — the ones that changed popular music — were recorded and mixed with an ear towards mono. His first eight albums have now been made available for the first time in digital format in their original mix. This collection is a “Greatest Hits” of his first eight albums with the single-only “Positively 4th Street” thrown in to complete the era (The song made its first LP appearance on Bob Dylan’s Greatest Hits). Solo tracks such as “Song to Woody,” “The Times They Are A-Changin’” and “Mr. Tambourine Man” make more sense as mono recordings and the full-band tracks, “Subterranean Homesick Blues,” “Like a Rolling Stone” and “I Want You” now sound exactly like they did coming out of transistor or car radios of the day. Looking past the mono vs. stereo dilemma, this is one great basic introduction to Bob Dylan, 1961-1968.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Bob Dylan appeared in the music world at a time when mono was the standard commercial format, with Stereo being a novel afterthought. Therefore, his early records — the ones that changed popular music — were recorded and mixed with an ear towards mono. His first eight albums have now been made available for the first time in digital format in their original mix. This collection is a “Greatest Hits” of his first eight albums with the single-only “Positively 4th Street” thrown in to complete the era (The song made its first LP appearance on Bob Dylan’s Greatest Hits). Solo tracks such as “Song to Woody,” “The Times They Are A-Changin’” and “Mr. Tambourine Man” make more sense as mono recordings and the full-band tracks, “Subterranean Homesick Blues,” “Like a Rolling Stone” and “I Want You” now sound exactly like they did coming out of transistor or car radios of the day. Looking past the mono vs. stereo dilemma, this is one great basic introduction to Bob Dylan, 1961-1968.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.3 out of 5
39 Ratings
39 Ratings
Thunderboomer ,

It's simple

How can you fault labels? Of course they're trying to make as much money as possible! Is someone forcing you to buy these songs again?? There are 30 second samples above -- You can clearly hear that these are the same recordings, just in mono. If you don't care about mono vs. stereo, then DON'T BUY THEM. If you prefer to listen to vinyl or your old CD stereo versions, then go listen to them. I really don't understand these comments. It's the same with the Beatles remastered comments. Do your original CDs or records suddenly disintegrate when they remaster the albums? In turn, FORCING you to purchase and listen to the new versions? No? Then just continue listening to the originals. Weird.

Bob'sBigBoy ,

Why?

Because this is the way it was meant to be listened to.

Carter439 ,

Please keep pointless negative reviews to yourself

It's strange that anyone could fault releasing Bob Dylan in mono. After all this is the way he wanted them to be heard, how they were originally released. Now there out, and it's amazing, just like the Beatles catalog. I can here Blonde on Blonde on headphones and not heres the drums distanly panned to the right for over a hour. What's the problem, why such hatred and negativity, where are peoples mind's at?

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