13 Songs, 48 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The story of the D.O.C. is one of hip-hop's great tragedies. Originally from Texas, he was down with the Fila Fresh Crew, and appeared on N.W.A and the Posse. Befriending Dr. Dre in the late ‘80s, he released his boldly titled debut album in 1989. Produced entirely by Dre, and recorded around the same time as Straight Outta Compton, No One Can Do It Better was an instant classic, absolutely loaded with dizzyingly intricate (but decidedly un-gangsta) lyricism and furiously rugged beat work. It also spawned runaway hits like "The Formula," and "It's Funky Enough." Shortly after receiving a gold plaque, the D.O.C. totaled his car and crushed his larynx, taking away the voice that was just about to make him a superstar. He went on to ghostwrite for Dre for many years, contributed heavily to The Chronic, and acted as mentor for a young Snoop Dogg. He eventually released two more albums over the years, though neither one made much noise. Regardless, No One remains an undeniably essential piece of rap music, as crucial today as it was 20 years ago.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The story of the D.O.C. is one of hip-hop's great tragedies. Originally from Texas, he was down with the Fila Fresh Crew, and appeared on N.W.A and the Posse. Befriending Dr. Dre in the late ‘80s, he released his boldly titled debut album in 1989. Produced entirely by Dre, and recorded around the same time as Straight Outta Compton, No One Can Do It Better was an instant classic, absolutely loaded with dizzyingly intricate (but decidedly un-gangsta) lyricism and furiously rugged beat work. It also spawned runaway hits like "The Formula," and "It's Funky Enough." Shortly after receiving a gold plaque, the D.O.C. totaled his car and crushed his larynx, taking away the voice that was just about to make him a superstar. He went on to ghostwrite for Dre for many years, contributed heavily to The Chronic, and acted as mentor for a young Snoop Dogg. He eventually released two more albums over the years, though neither one made much noise. Regardless, No One remains an undeniably essential piece of rap music, as crucial today as it was 20 years ago.

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