12 Songs, 43 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Eponymous was released in 1988 as a brief summary of R.E.M.’s early days with I.R.S. Records, just as the band moved to Warner Brothers. It became immediately essential for the inclusion of the original Hib-Tone single version of “Radio Free Europe,” which most fans hadn't heard (the song had been rerecorded for R.E.M.’s first album, Murmur). The other three unusual tracks are “Gardening at Night” with a different vocal mix than on the Chronic Town EP (which boosts Michael Stipe’s voice to the point where one can nearly hear his every word); “Finest Worksong,” which appears in its Mutual Drum Horn Mix that differs greatly from the mix on Document; and “Romance,” which had only appeared on the 1987 soundtrack to the film Made in Heaven. The remaining tracks are highlights from the band’s career to date, including the hits “Can’t Get There from Here,” “Fall on Me,” “The One I Love,” and “It’s the End of the World as We Know It (And I Feel Fine).” 

EDITORS’ NOTES

Eponymous was released in 1988 as a brief summary of R.E.M.’s early days with I.R.S. Records, just as the band moved to Warner Brothers. It became immediately essential for the inclusion of the original Hib-Tone single version of “Radio Free Europe,” which most fans hadn't heard (the song had been rerecorded for R.E.M.’s first album, Murmur). The other three unusual tracks are “Gardening at Night” with a different vocal mix than on the Chronic Town EP (which boosts Michael Stipe’s voice to the point where one can nearly hear his every word); “Finest Worksong,” which appears in its Mutual Drum Horn Mix that differs greatly from the mix on Document; and “Romance,” which had only appeared on the 1987 soundtrack to the film Made in Heaven. The remaining tracks are highlights from the band’s career to date, including the hits “Can’t Get There from Here,” “Fall on Me,” “The One I Love,” and “It’s the End of the World as We Know It (And I Feel Fine).” 

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Ratings and Reviews

4.7 out of 5
23 Ratings
23 Ratings
Vega63 ,

No Lyrics in the 80’s

Part of the massive appeal of R.E.M. is that most everyone was trying to figure out the words in the songs. Many campus dorm parties had kids sitting trying to decipher. So, despite not knowing the lyrics, the music and vocal tones where enough to make them the college campus favorites in the 80’s. (Now, just Google it. Which is ironic to finally read what he was singing about decades later, which peaks my interest all over again. GREAT ALBUM

Jason1225 ,

incredibly notable compilation. different (maybe better) mixes

I wrote this off for a long time, especially given the ‘and i feel fine’ compilation has a ton of great versions of classic IRS era songs. However, this has some great alternate mixes that really stand out from the original album versions. vocals and instrumentation are much clearer. Finest work song has a freaking horn section. great stuff!

Mike McMichaelson ,

This got me hooked on R.E.M.

Near perfect compilation of this R.E.M. era, just forgot to add Perfect Circle and Swan Swan H and this is perfect. Still a great track selection, though.

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