11 Songs, 32 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

By 1977, three years after The Stooges split up, band frontman Iggy Pop and guitarist James Williamson had outgrown punk rock (which The Stooges had done first anyway) and recorded Kill City: an album that mixed saucy rock ’n’ roll with songwriterly sophistication and instrumentation (acoustic and slide guitar!). Iggy had by then streamlined his hyper-reactive personality and mastered the art of the rock ’n’ roll caricature (“Teen magazines won’t let me be/I feel so clean but they’re all digging dirt on me”), and he was on. In fact, when his metal-tongued croon met Williamson’s riffs, things got stupidly tasty—from a hit-in-a-perfect-world (“Consolation Prizes”) to a beautiful Stonesy track (“No Sense of Crime”) to a sleazy strut (“Sell Your Love”) to a perfect Roxy Music nod (“Night Theme”). This could’ve been The Stooges had they lasted longer (both “I Got Nuthin’” and “Johanna” are Stooges leftovers). Iggy was still the world’s forgotten boy; remember, The Stooges were an obscure band in their day. And that napalm heart of his? That was kid stuff by 1977.

EDITORS’ NOTES

By 1977, three years after The Stooges split up, band frontman Iggy Pop and guitarist James Williamson had outgrown punk rock (which The Stooges had done first anyway) and recorded Kill City: an album that mixed saucy rock ’n’ roll with songwriterly sophistication and instrumentation (acoustic and slide guitar!). Iggy had by then streamlined his hyper-reactive personality and mastered the art of the rock ’n’ roll caricature (“Teen magazines won’t let me be/I feel so clean but they’re all digging dirt on me”), and he was on. In fact, when his metal-tongued croon met Williamson’s riffs, things got stupidly tasty—from a hit-in-a-perfect-world (“Consolation Prizes”) to a beautiful Stonesy track (“No Sense of Crime”) to a sleazy strut (“Sell Your Love”) to a perfect Roxy Music nod (“Night Theme”). This could’ve been The Stooges had they lasted longer (both “I Got Nuthin’” and “Johanna” are Stooges leftovers). Iggy was still the world’s forgotten boy; remember, The Stooges were an obscure band in their day. And that napalm heart of his? That was kid stuff by 1977.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
13 Ratings
13 Ratings
rexrzer ,

Released Late; the Original Kill City Much Hard Rockin' than this

Give it 5 stars because they at least released a "version" of the original Kill City, which I have, along with my original copy of Metallic KO, both two of my most prized punk rock anthem albums. If you can't somehow get ahold of the unexpurgated, raw, explicit Kill City like I have (and who knows, it may be circulating out there somewhere), this is the 2nd best thing to it. The album's best tracks are Johanna, Consolation Prizes, Lucky Monkeys, and the fine, long James Williamson guitar riffs in Master Charge (like Iggy ever had one!). No Sense of Crime is short, and sweet, even though it's one of the longer tracks. On my older album for comparison, that track is almost 6 minutes long. I was very surprised to see this released in a "clean state" this past January 29, 2008, so there you go! At least the album showcases the heavy guitar work of James Williamson, over and over, song by song, and you can leave it to your imagination how some of the original lyrics never made it into this release. Kill City is a must have for any Iggy and James fan, in spite of it's clean-base release in the name of commerce. I saw Iggy and James in Southern California live more than 10 times back in the day, and more than any other album here in the Apple Store this is the one that at least tries to bring back the original flavor; they just leave out the raunchy, power-laden explicit lyrics and what you get, I guess you should be happy to have.

Jeeterville ,

WoW

WOrk it babY………..

Roy Edroso ,

Kill City -- Re-Killed

Think of this as the small, ratty apartment in which Iggy convalesced between his out-of-his-mind-on-drugs era and his no-more-beating-my-brains comeback. It had plenty of the old melancholy (particularly on "I Got Nothin'") and as much grandeur as he could then afford -- the stripped down Sales Brothers sound was still a ways off. A neat, reclusive album that reminds me of Johnny Thunders for some reason.

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