18 Songs, 1 Hour 14 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The gloriously syrupy drones of Gene Loves Jezebel's frontmen (twin brothers Jay and Micheal Aston) rose in the afterglow of such pop doomsayers as Bauhuas and Siouxsie & The Banshees. And it all worked together swimmingly. This set collects everything great the band did between the years 1983 and 1999, from their broody dance-club hurts (“Bruises,” “Influenza," and “The Cow”) to the stuff recorded after former Gen X guitarist James Stevenson had joined the fold (the big-lunged hits “Desire,” “The Motion of Love," and “Jealous”). Stevenson’s muscular modal riffs brought pop energy and concise songcraft; this helped the band’s fortunes rise, especially in the United States, throughout the mid- and late '80s. By 1993’s should’ve-been-big “Josephina,” the band were all but done—but not before they released the truly beautiful “Who Wants to Go to Heaven” in 1999, a tune that fittingly closes this set.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The gloriously syrupy drones of Gene Loves Jezebel's frontmen (twin brothers Jay and Micheal Aston) rose in the afterglow of such pop doomsayers as Bauhuas and Siouxsie & The Banshees. And it all worked together swimmingly. This set collects everything great the band did between the years 1983 and 1999, from their broody dance-club hurts (“Bruises,” “Influenza," and “The Cow”) to the stuff recorded after former Gen X guitarist James Stevenson had joined the fold (the big-lunged hits “Desire,” “The Motion of Love," and “Jealous”). Stevenson’s muscular modal riffs brought pop energy and concise songcraft; this helped the band’s fortunes rise, especially in the United States, throughout the mid- and late '80s. By 1993’s should’ve-been-big “Josephina,” the band were all but done—but not before they released the truly beautiful “Who Wants to Go to Heaven” in 1999, a tune that fittingly closes this set.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.4 out of 5
22 Ratings
22 Ratings
Deadwood Metropolis ,

A Different Kind of Cool

I climbed Mount Fuji in Japan listening to (GLJ)'s House of Dolls on one side of a cassette and Depeche Mode's Violator on the other over and over. I really got into them after seeing a Gene Loves Gezebel / Flesh For Lulu concert in High School. This is a very cool band that threw down with a combination of eccentric alt.rock, unique vocals, and cool guitar. The sometimes swirling and frequetly urgent sound always had something about it that the more you listened the more it was addicting. This is a good smattering of songs from their catalog, with some great tracks. Only one or two songs could have been skipped, because they have so many other great songs to pull from. I never liked Stephen.

There are too many good songs here not to make it Five Stars... Twenty Killer Hurts, Heartache, Gorgeous, Desire, Always a Flame, Break the Chain, Josephina, Bruises, Upstairs, and The Cow are favorites.

If you want to check out more of their music, House of Dolls is probably their most accessible album. In its entirety, a great album, getting better song for song until the final four songs really take you on a musical trip. Immigrant, Discover, and Heavenly Bodies are other favorites. Heavenly Bodies was underrated, and had it received more airplay, might have givien them increased visibility. Most of the album is pretty good

koernermd ,

Brilliant

This album takes me back to high school and my first experiences in underground clubs...Unfortunately we never got to hear much more than the 12" Desire. Great work...

mrtew ,

Fantastic

Hard to believe they were playing Hall and Oats and Phil Collins nonstop on the radio back in the 80’s where there was brilliant music like this they could have been listening to. Oh well, a little bit of heartache never hurt anyone. The stuff after this album came out is even better really too, I listen to the 2000’s albums to this day.

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