5 Songs, 37 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

With one of the most indelible basslines in music history, the curtains open onto Journey into Satchidananda. Cecil McBee puts so much weight and stature into the opening figure of the album’s title track that the music seems pulled straight from the Earth’s soil. The contributions of McBee and drummer Rashied Ali cannot be overstated; they provide the anchor around which Alice Coltrane’s harp and piano is allowed to hum and float. Additionally, Vishnu Wood’s oud, Tulsi Sen Gupta’s tambura, and Majid Shabazz’s bells and tambourine cast over these songs a ceremonial dust directly inspired by Coltrane’s study of Hindu ritual. This is music not just for meditation, but for transportation; through the unfurling layers of Coltrane’s music, regal vistas from the past and future begin to take shape before your eyes. Utterly serene yet deeply rooted in the toil of the blues, Journey in Satchidananda brought a whole new sound into being and confirmed Alice Coltrane as a musical personality equal to, but distinct from, her husband.

EDITORS’ NOTES

With one of the most indelible basslines in music history, the curtains open onto Journey into Satchidananda. Cecil McBee puts so much weight and stature into the opening figure of the album’s title track that the music seems pulled straight from the Earth’s soil. The contributions of McBee and drummer Rashied Ali cannot be overstated; they provide the anchor around which Alice Coltrane’s harp and piano is allowed to hum and float. Additionally, Vishnu Wood’s oud, Tulsi Sen Gupta’s tambura, and Majid Shabazz’s bells and tambourine cast over these songs a ceremonial dust directly inspired by Coltrane’s study of Hindu ritual. This is music not just for meditation, but for transportation; through the unfurling layers of Coltrane’s music, regal vistas from the past and future begin to take shape before your eyes. Utterly serene yet deeply rooted in the toil of the blues, Journey in Satchidananda brought a whole new sound into being and confirmed Alice Coltrane as a musical personality equal to, but distinct from, her husband.

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