9 Songs, 28 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

In the tradition of the '60s folk revival, Annie Crane sings of small-town memories and big-city heartaches on her sophomore album, Jump with a Child’s Heart. The Rochester, N.Y., native brings a classically trained vocal purity to her mélange of Celtic, Appalachian, and blues influences, setting her apart from typical neo-folkie singer/songwriters. Her lyrics are likewise distinctive, combining mystical tones with an Everywoman earnestness that elevates ordinary subjects into something exotic. Crane shows her skills as a musical miniaturist on tracks like “Copenhagen Heart,” “The Island of Manhattan," and “Ghost Body,” dashing off quick but telling portraits with a bittersweet air. There’s a quiet but persistent sense of rebellion evident in songs like the wry “Money Only Hates Me” and the playful “Salinger Said,” lending them a contemporary edge. Most haunting among these tunes is “Lookin’ Out,” a moody recollection of Crane’s grandmother. Trumpet, banjo, cello, and light percussion give evocative shading to these acoustic guitar–centered tracks. Crane’s vision is earthy yet poetic, the work of an artist who lives in both the real world and her own dreams.

EDITORS’ NOTES

In the tradition of the '60s folk revival, Annie Crane sings of small-town memories and big-city heartaches on her sophomore album, Jump with a Child’s Heart. The Rochester, N.Y., native brings a classically trained vocal purity to her mélange of Celtic, Appalachian, and blues influences, setting her apart from typical neo-folkie singer/songwriters. Her lyrics are likewise distinctive, combining mystical tones with an Everywoman earnestness that elevates ordinary subjects into something exotic. Crane shows her skills as a musical miniaturist on tracks like “Copenhagen Heart,” “The Island of Manhattan," and “Ghost Body,” dashing off quick but telling portraits with a bittersweet air. There’s a quiet but persistent sense of rebellion evident in songs like the wry “Money Only Hates Me” and the playful “Salinger Said,” lending them a contemporary edge. Most haunting among these tunes is “Lookin’ Out,” a moody recollection of Crane’s grandmother. Trumpet, banjo, cello, and light percussion give evocative shading to these acoustic guitar–centered tracks. Crane’s vision is earthy yet poetic, the work of an artist who lives in both the real world and her own dreams.

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