10 Songs, 28 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Toro y Moi’s Underneath the Pine was one of 2011's best albums: its combination of ethereal ambience, cool-toned funk, and pop melodicism hit the sweet spot. (Toro y Moi is the moniker of South Carolinian Chaz Bundick.) June 2009, released a year after Underneath the Pine, is a collection of the singer/songwriter's early efforts. One standout, “Take the L to Leave,” recalls Ariel Pink, and at various points (including the excellent “Ektelon”) lo-fi granddaddies Pavement come to mind. The brief, dreamy opening of “Dead Pontoon” is pure Toro y Moi; it has the distinctive hazy sound that Bundick later developed into fully formed pop songs. “Talamak,” which is on 2010’s Causers of This, is here in a less streamlined version. “Warm Frames” surrounds listeners with a cloud of layered vocals and gentle, reverberant guitar strumming. The closer, “New Loved Ones,” is what Bundick sounds like when things get stripped down to a song, a voice, and an acoustic guitar.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Toro y Moi’s Underneath the Pine was one of 2011's best albums: its combination of ethereal ambience, cool-toned funk, and pop melodicism hit the sweet spot. (Toro y Moi is the moniker of South Carolinian Chaz Bundick.) June 2009, released a year after Underneath the Pine, is a collection of the singer/songwriter's early efforts. One standout, “Take the L to Leave,” recalls Ariel Pink, and at various points (including the excellent “Ektelon”) lo-fi granddaddies Pavement come to mind. The brief, dreamy opening of “Dead Pontoon” is pure Toro y Moi; it has the distinctive hazy sound that Bundick later developed into fully formed pop songs. “Talamak,” which is on 2010’s Causers of This, is here in a less streamlined version. “Warm Frames” surrounds listeners with a cloud of layered vocals and gentle, reverberant guitar strumming. The closer, “New Loved Ones,” is what Bundick sounds like when things get stripped down to a song, a voice, and an acoustic guitar.

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