12 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Where Corin Tucker’s loose solo debut marked a clear break from the rambunctious indie rock of Sleater-Kinney, on Kill My Blues, you can more keenly sense the restlessness that drove her back to her old band in 2015. “Groundhog Day” channels the daily frustrations of a working mom into a fidgety punk-spiked rant, and “Neskowin” reintroduces Tucker’s signature shriek atop barbed-wire disco. But “Constance”—part Doors-like organ odyssey, part Nirvana-esque grunge grind—finds Tucker articulating her rage in novel ways.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Where Corin Tucker’s loose solo debut marked a clear break from the rambunctious indie rock of Sleater-Kinney, on Kill My Blues, you can more keenly sense the restlessness that drove her back to her old band in 2015. “Groundhog Day” channels the daily frustrations of a working mom into a fidgety punk-spiked rant, and “Neskowin” reintroduces Tucker’s signature shriek atop barbed-wire disco. But “Constance”—part Doors-like organ odyssey, part Nirvana-esque grunge grind—finds Tucker articulating her rage in novel ways.

TITLE TIME
2:29
3:58
4:34
2:41
3:49
2:05
4:20
4:11
4:28
2:15
3:06
3:40

About The Corin Tucker Band

15 years after co-founding Sleater-Kinney, riot grrrl Corin Tucker found herself playing a benefit show in Portland, OR, where she sprinkled several new songs into her solo set. After the show, Tucker — who’d been on hiatus with Sleater-Kinney since 2006 — decided to turn those new songs into an album. She took the material to Little Gold Book Studios in northeast Portland, where she began recording the 11-track record with help from percussionist Sara Lund (of Hungry Ghost) and Golden Bears members Seth Lorinczi and Julianna Bright. The resulting album, 1,000 Years, was released in 2010.

Songs

Albums

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