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Teenage Head

Teenage Head

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iTunes Editors’ Notes

You don’t need to listen to Teenage Head’s entire 1979 eponymous debut album to realize the band was much more than “Canada’s answer to The Ramones” (as it was panned by many a snarky critic back in the day). But you should still hear all 10 of these tunes, which brilliantly blend power pop, rockabilly, new wave, punk, and garage rock into a supercharged sound loaded to the gills with barbed hooks. “Top Down” opens, with hard-chugging guitar riffs colliding with hyper rhythms as singer Frankie Venom sneers his vocals. “Ain’t Got No Sense” offers up classic-sounding late-'70s punk with melodic, blaring guitar distortion and pogo-friendly singing that recalls faster moments from The Nerves’ 1976 self-titled EP. The Pop works in twangy surf guitar and gallons of wet, vintage vocal reverb in “Bonerack” before the fan favorite “Picture My Face” downshifts the drumming for a midtempo tune reflecting the Los Angeles power pop sound. The band injects Chuck Berry riffs and endearingly offbeat handclaps into the punk-pop standout “Curtain Jumper,” while “Little Boxes” delves into '50s-inspired rock ‘n’ roll.

Customer Reviews

Unforgettable !!!

These boys know how to rock & roll. This album was the soundtrack to many a Southern Ontario hipster's nights of merriment in the suburbs or r'n'r up at the lake. Gordie Lewis would fry an incredible mélange of punk, rockabilly or roots rock from that old Gibson guitar, Chuck Berry’s influence never far from the surface of his fantastic fret work. At the live shows Nick's drums played like a possessed machine gun behind Steve's chomping and distinctive bass. Frankie was our homegrown Mick Jaeger. They were truly special.

Teenage Head

Well if you told me when I was 16 rocking out to Frankie V that 30 years later I would find this album on something called the internet....well you get it. I must have seen these guys 20 times in concert from my high school to Ontario Place. So here I am in Montgomery Alabama with a wife and kid rocking out in my kitchen...greatest album ever!

"Picture My Face"

Get that song. A hidden classic of power pop. You'll love life a little more.

Biography

Formed: 1976 in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

Genre: Rock

Years Active: '70s, '80s, '90s, '00s

Often billed as Canada's answer to the Ramones, Teenage Head were in truth just as much a new wave band as they were a punk rock outfit. They had a similar affection for pre-Beatles rock & roll, especially rockabilly, as well as a sense of trashy fun that made them a terrific party band when they were on. Their songs were unpretentious celebrations of all the classic rock & roll staples: cars, booze, girls, partying, and teenage rebellion. Notorious for inadvertently touching off one of the...
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Teenage Head, Teenage Head
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