10 Songs, 48 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Veteran hard rockers Chevelle recorded again with producer Joe Barresi, who worked magic on 2011’s Hats Off to the Bull and has helped prog-metal groups like Tool and Coheed and Cambria define their sounds. Together, they've made one of the strongest albums of Chevelle's career. Frontman Pete Loeffler puts his love of horror movies (Rosemary’s Baby, The Walking Dead) into his approach; the album title translates from Spanish as "The Gargoyle." This, along with Loeffler's fascination with strange guitar stomp boxes, results in songs and guitar tones that sound as hungry and weird as ever. A tune like “Jawbreaker” brings out the best in the band, with a mix of dry vocals and layered guitar tracks. The opening guitar lines of “One Ocean” show a hint of psychedelia that’s kept tight by Dean Bernardini’s solid, melodic bass and drummer Sam Loeffler’s no-nonsense playing. This leads into a tune that’s subdued and sublime, with some of Pete Loeffler’s best vocals. This ability to expand their approach without losing their voice is what’s likely to keep Chevelle going long after their competition call it quits.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Veteran hard rockers Chevelle recorded again with producer Joe Barresi, who worked magic on 2011’s Hats Off to the Bull and has helped prog-metal groups like Tool and Coheed and Cambria define their sounds. Together, they've made one of the strongest albums of Chevelle's career. Frontman Pete Loeffler puts his love of horror movies (Rosemary’s Baby, The Walking Dead) into his approach; the album title translates from Spanish as "The Gargoyle." This, along with Loeffler's fascination with strange guitar stomp boxes, results in songs and guitar tones that sound as hungry and weird as ever. A tune like “Jawbreaker” brings out the best in the band, with a mix of dry vocals and layered guitar tracks. The opening guitar lines of “One Ocean” show a hint of psychedelia that’s kept tight by Dean Bernardini’s solid, melodic bass and drummer Sam Loeffler’s no-nonsense playing. This leads into a tune that’s subdued and sublime, with some of Pete Loeffler’s best vocals. This ability to expand their approach without losing their voice is what’s likely to keep Chevelle going long after their competition call it quits.

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