6 Songs, 49 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The tenor saxophonist Bill McHenry has a big sound that comes right at you. His 2011 release Ghosts of the Sun was excellent, and 2012’s La Peur du Vide doesn't disappoint. McHenry leads a fine band—pianist Orrin Evans, bassist Eric Revis, and drummer Andrew Cyrille—through a set of originals recorded live at the Village Vanguard in New York. The group immediately asserts itself on the Coltrane-flavored opener, “Siglo XX,” a tribute to trumpeter Woody Shaw and actor Paul Robeson. The group creates a swirl of sound behind McHenry as he makes an inspired statement; later, Evans plays a solo that matches McHenry’s effort. (Check out the pianist’s delightful dissonances.) The next cut, “Today,” is a moody ballad, as succinct and lyrical as “Siglo XX” is expansive and brawny. “Recognition” is a tribute to saxophonist J.D. Allen, including breathy sounds from McHenry, rubbed-drumhead percussion, and bowed bass. “Trillard,” written for saxophonist Stacy Dillard, closes the album. Revis plays an intriguing bass solo early on in the 14-minute track, and Cyrille’s solo is full of unexpected moves.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The tenor saxophonist Bill McHenry has a big sound that comes right at you. His 2011 release Ghosts of the Sun was excellent, and 2012’s La Peur du Vide doesn't disappoint. McHenry leads a fine band—pianist Orrin Evans, bassist Eric Revis, and drummer Andrew Cyrille—through a set of originals recorded live at the Village Vanguard in New York. The group immediately asserts itself on the Coltrane-flavored opener, “Siglo XX,” a tribute to trumpeter Woody Shaw and actor Paul Robeson. The group creates a swirl of sound behind McHenry as he makes an inspired statement; later, Evans plays a solo that matches McHenry’s effort. (Check out the pianist’s delightful dissonances.) The next cut, “Today,” is a moody ballad, as succinct and lyrical as “Siglo XX” is expansive and brawny. “Recognition” is a tribute to saxophonist J.D. Allen, including breathy sounds from McHenry, rubbed-drumhead percussion, and bowed bass. “Trillard,” written for saxophonist Stacy Dillard, closes the album. Revis plays an intriguing bass solo early on in the 14-minute track, and Cyrille’s solo is full of unexpected moves.

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