12 Songs, 54 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

As the son of the late, great Muddy Waters, Larry “Mud” Morganfield brings high expectations to his own career as a blues artist. He more than fulfills them on Son of the Seventh Son, an album brimming with the sort of swagger and sly charm that made his dad a legend. Morganfield claims his heritage without strain, applying his rich baritone voice to a mixed set of originals and covers fleshed out by an A-list roster of Chicago blues veterans. The title track radiates a moody, erotic mojo, giving Mud plenty of room to strut as producer Bob Corritore honks away on harmonica. “Love to Flirt” and “Leave Me Alone” cook nicely in an upbeat shuffle vein, while “Midnight Lover” turns the heat down to a seductive simmer. Morganfield tempers his style with a little earthy humor (“Short Dress Woman”) and recounts his hard times with a survivor’s spirit (“Blues in My Shoes"). His rendition of his father’s tune “You Can’t Lose What You Ain’t Never Had” is both reverent and personal, underscored by Billy Flynn’s stinging slide guitar work. Overall, Mud does right by his legacy on this confident, compelling set.

EDITORS’ NOTES

As the son of the late, great Muddy Waters, Larry “Mud” Morganfield brings high expectations to his own career as a blues artist. He more than fulfills them on Son of the Seventh Son, an album brimming with the sort of swagger and sly charm that made his dad a legend. Morganfield claims his heritage without strain, applying his rich baritone voice to a mixed set of originals and covers fleshed out by an A-list roster of Chicago blues veterans. The title track radiates a moody, erotic mojo, giving Mud plenty of room to strut as producer Bob Corritore honks away on harmonica. “Love to Flirt” and “Leave Me Alone” cook nicely in an upbeat shuffle vein, while “Midnight Lover” turns the heat down to a seductive simmer. Morganfield tempers his style with a little earthy humor (“Short Dress Woman”) and recounts his hard times with a survivor’s spirit (“Blues in My Shoes"). His rendition of his father’s tune “You Can’t Lose What You Ain’t Never Had” is both reverent and personal, underscored by Billy Flynn’s stinging slide guitar work. Overall, Mud does right by his legacy on this confident, compelling set.

TITLE TIME
3:31
4:41
2:54
4:49
6:06
4:05
4:07
7:46
3:33
4:24
3:34
4:53

About Mud Morganfield

Born Larry Williams in 1954, the eldest son of blues great McKinley Morganfield, otherwise known as Muddy Waters, Mud Morganfield (who has also gone by the name Muddy Waters Jr.), naturally grew up surrounded by music, and particularly the blues, and he's played music all of his life, starting with the drums his dad gave him as a child, then moving on to the bass guitar. Supporting himself as a truck driver, just like his father did when he was first starting out, Morganfield didn't seriously consider being a professional blues musician until after Waters' death in 1983, by which time Morganfield was already close to 30. Possessing a baritone voice very much like his father's, and blessed with a similar sense of vocal phrasing and a sense of how to command a stage, Morganfield made up for lost time, cutting his teeth in the soutside Chicago clubs where he was soon a popular draw on the blues club and festival circuit; he mixed both original songs and Muddy Waters classics into his live sets. A debut album, Fall Waters Fall, was self-released in 2008, followed by a proper first album, Son of a Seventh Son, in 2012 from Severn Records. ~ Steve Leggett

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