11 Songs, 1 Hour 2 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Jason Pierce’s most optimistic album to date, Let It Come Down finds the Spiritualized maestro relieving himself of his demons and embracing the wide-eyed wonder of Phil Spector and Brian Wilson. Conceived in the spirit of the Ronettes, “Do It All Over Again” and “Stop Your Crying” are swelling, golden pop songs that are easily among Spiritualized’s most accessible and effervescent songs to date. Pierce’s knack for orchestral arrangement extends to mood pieces like “Out of Sight” and “The Straight and Narrow,” while “Anything More” recalls the melodramatic melancholy of Scott Walker. Of course, Pierce hasn’t abandoned his rock roots. He applies the Wall of Sound technique to sneering rock ’n roll on “On Fire” and “The Twelve Steps.” Pierce has always had a tradition of reworking old songs. So it seems particularly appropriate that Let It Come Down closes with the Spacemen 3-era hymn “Lord Can You Hear Me,” indicating that Pierce has the musical resources to make his old songs sound the way he originally intended. But perhaps more importantly, “Lord Can You Hear Me” helps restore Pierce’s faith in gospel music by reconciling the writer with his musical past.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Jason Pierce’s most optimistic album to date, Let It Come Down finds the Spiritualized maestro relieving himself of his demons and embracing the wide-eyed wonder of Phil Spector and Brian Wilson. Conceived in the spirit of the Ronettes, “Do It All Over Again” and “Stop Your Crying” are swelling, golden pop songs that are easily among Spiritualized’s most accessible and effervescent songs to date. Pierce’s knack for orchestral arrangement extends to mood pieces like “Out of Sight” and “The Straight and Narrow,” while “Anything More” recalls the melodramatic melancholy of Scott Walker. Of course, Pierce hasn’t abandoned his rock roots. He applies the Wall of Sound technique to sneering rock ’n roll on “On Fire” and “The Twelve Steps.” Pierce has always had a tradition of reworking old songs. So it seems particularly appropriate that Let It Come Down closes with the Spacemen 3-era hymn “Lord Can You Hear Me,” indicating that Pierce has the musical resources to make his old songs sound the way he originally intended. But perhaps more importantly, “Lord Can You Hear Me” helps restore Pierce’s faith in gospel music by reconciling the writer with his musical past.

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