11 Songs, 49 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Jack Tatum’s chiming, ‘80s-style indie-pop under the Wild Nothing name has always struck a keen balance between abstract and direct, couching pop-minded songwriting in atmosphere so plush you could probably catch a decent nap in it. A richer, more elaborately arranged album than Gemini and Nocturne, Life of Pause adds Steve Reich-style marimba patterns (“Reichpop”), fluttering saxophones (“Lady Blue”), and newfound sonic clarity to the mix, channeling the sumptuous detachment of post-Berlin Bowie and focusing Tatum’s dream without ever disturbing it.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Jack Tatum’s chiming, ‘80s-style indie-pop under the Wild Nothing name has always struck a keen balance between abstract and direct, couching pop-minded songwriting in atmosphere so plush you could probably catch a decent nap in it. A richer, more elaborately arranged album than Gemini and Nocturne, Life of Pause adds Steve Reich-style marimba patterns (“Reichpop”), fluttering saxophones (“Lady Blue”), and newfound sonic clarity to the mix, channeling the sumptuous detachment of post-Berlin Bowie and focusing Tatum’s dream without ever disturbing it.

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