16 Songs, 38 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

A gifted Texas guitar player whose sharp-edged blend of R&B, rockabilly, and soul helped define the late-‘60s Fort Worth scene, Ray Sharpe never received the recognition that was his due, and he’s now remembered mostly for a single song. That song is “Linda Lu”: a stomping bit of Tex-Mex R&B with a hip-smacking country backbeat. It’s still performed in barrooms and dancehalls throughout the Southwest and has been covered by the likes of Doug Sahm, Bobby Fuller, and even The Rolling Stones. Rockabilly Attitude is a concise sampler of Sharpe’s late-‘50s and early-‘60s output, and it should be a real eye-opener for listeners who only know him for his one epochal hit. The title, however, is a bit misleading. While Sharpe tries on a wide array of styles—from the countrified rumba of “Justine” to the roadhouse boogie of “That’s The Way I Feel”—nothing here can be pinned down as straight rockabilly. Sharpe’s talent is far too mercurial for that.

EDITORS’ NOTES

A gifted Texas guitar player whose sharp-edged blend of R&B, rockabilly, and soul helped define the late-‘60s Fort Worth scene, Ray Sharpe never received the recognition that was his due, and he’s now remembered mostly for a single song. That song is “Linda Lu”: a stomping bit of Tex-Mex R&B with a hip-smacking country backbeat. It’s still performed in barrooms and dancehalls throughout the Southwest and has been covered by the likes of Doug Sahm, Bobby Fuller, and even The Rolling Stones. Rockabilly Attitude is a concise sampler of Sharpe’s late-‘50s and early-‘60s output, and it should be a real eye-opener for listeners who only know him for his one epochal hit. The title, however, is a bit misleading. While Sharpe tries on a wide array of styles—from the countrified rumba of “Justine” to the roadhouse boogie of “That’s The Way I Feel”—nothing here can be pinned down as straight rockabilly. Sharpe’s talent is far too mercurial for that.

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