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Live At the Academy of Music 1971

The Band

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Album Review

Not so much an expansion of 1972's classic double-live album Rock of Ages, but an exhaustive tribute to its source material, the four-CD/one-DVD 2013 box set Live at the Academy of Music 1971 digs deep into the Band's year-end four-night stint at New York City's Academy of Music. The original 18-track sequence for the 1972 LP has been abandoned in favor of a double-concert construct, where the first two discs present one version of each of the 29 songs the Band played over the course of these four nights, while the final two discs present the entirety of the New Years Eve concert that capped off this residency; this CD is remixed from the soundboard tapes, and the DVD replicates this New Years Eve concert (note that there is no footage of the NYE concert, so the music is presented with a selection of stills; nevertheless, there are full clips of the Band performing "King Harvest (Has Surely Come)" and "The W.S. Walcott Medicine Show" on December 30, which are welcome). This structure is an appealing one but invites perhaps more duplications than are necessary. The 29 songs on the first two disc contain 11 songs from the New Years Eve show — including the four-song encore with Bob Dylan — but the trade-off is the NYE concert is loaded with unheard versions of familiar songs: 16 of the 27 songs are previously unreleased (in contrast, the only unearthed song on the first two discs is a killer version of "Strawberry Wine"). Perhaps some of these performances are ever so slightly rougher than the accompanying ones on the first two discs, but that liveliness is part of the appeal (besides, this is hardly ragged; as enthusiastic as the Band is, they're also supplemented by Allen Toussaint's horn section, so they do need to hit their marks to ensure all the elements fit together). Rock of Ages and, in turn, Live at the Academy of Music 1971 do close out the early years of the Band. They'd tour again, supporting Bob Dylan in 1974, and they turned out a few more records before disbanding in 1976, but they never seemed as triumphant as they did at the end of 1971. Although this box is not perfect — it's hard not to wish there were no duplications on the first two discs, or the last two — it is nevertheless a mighty testament to the Band at the peak of their powers.

Customer Reviews

Rock and roll revelations

This set has always been an indispensable document of The Band at their live pinnacle. Now, with remixed versions of the classics, the beautiful is now ravishing. No one in rock and roll matches these five musicians for soul, heart, and honesty. And together, the chemistry makes them a rare comet indeed.

.....the best of The Band!

This is the definitive recording of The Band live. Second to this would be the Rock of Ages recording, not counting some sweet bootlegs. Perfect harmonies, and the soul in this music inspired so many other musicians and bands. Many would do well to listen to this and discover the treasure that exists here, and with the musicians in this band. Enjoy these recordings!

The Band

I've loved The Band since I first heard The Weight when I was a kid, now twenty five years later ,they are still the best band I've ever heard! J.Sturm Haskell Ar.

Biography

Formed: 1967 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Genre: Rock

Years Active: '60s, '70s, '80s, '90s

For roughly half a decade, from 1968 through 1975, the Band was one of the most popular and influential rock groups in the world, their music embraced by critics (and, to a somewhat lesser degree, the public) as seriously as the music of the Beatles and the Rolling Stones. Their albums were analyzed and reviewed as intensely as any records by their one-time employer and sometime mentor Bob Dylan. Although the Band retired from touring after The Last Waltz and disbanded several...
Full Bio

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