18 Songs, 1 Hour, 43 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Nothing at all against Charlie Robison’s studio recordings, but he's deepest in his element when he’s onstage playing Red Dirt country rock for a festive crowd. After all, Live at Billy Bob’s Texas is his third live album. This one opens with Robison and band starting the party on a rowdy cover of Bobby Bare Jr.’s “Nothin’ Better to Do.” Their soaring three-part vocal harmonies provide a nice contrast to the crunchy guitar distortion and grinding Hammond B3 organ. Robison’s party anthem “Good Times” makes for a perfect chaser. Here he gussies up an old-school honky-tonk style with overdriven tube amps that sound borrowed from Neil Young & Crazy Horse. “Feelin’ Good” (from Robinson’s fifth studio album, Beautiful Day) continues with the uplifting melodies, but here he dials back the rock in lieu of turning up the twang. And here we’re reminded that Robison is a Texas native and one of the last few guys out there keeping the Lone Star sound alive and kicking. He even turns Elton John’s “Rocket Man” into a weepy Americana ballad.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Nothing at all against Charlie Robison’s studio recordings, but he's deepest in his element when he’s onstage playing Red Dirt country rock for a festive crowd. After all, Live at Billy Bob’s Texas is his third live album. This one opens with Robison and band starting the party on a rowdy cover of Bobby Bare Jr.’s “Nothin’ Better to Do.” Their soaring three-part vocal harmonies provide a nice contrast to the crunchy guitar distortion and grinding Hammond B3 organ. Robison’s party anthem “Good Times” makes for a perfect chaser. Here he gussies up an old-school honky-tonk style with overdriven tube amps that sound borrowed from Neil Young & Crazy Horse. “Feelin’ Good” (from Robinson’s fifth studio album, Beautiful Day) continues with the uplifting melodies, but here he dials back the rock in lieu of turning up the twang. And here we’re reminded that Robison is a Texas native and one of the last few guys out there keeping the Lone Star sound alive and kicking. He even turns Elton John’s “Rocket Man” into a weepy Americana ballad.

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4:37
3:12
3:28
3:11
4:19
5:08
4:34
5:56
4:17
6:30
6:28
10:37
5:38
5:48
10:28
4:05
7:30
7:24

About Charlie Robison

Texas singer/songwriter Charlie Robison was born in Houston and raised on his family's ranch in the town of Bandera; absorbing the music he heard on the local honky tonk scene, he and brother Bruce -- later an acclaimed performer in his own right -- were also brought up on artists ranging from Black Sabbath to Gram Parsons to Bruce Springsteen. After discovering the thriving music scene in nearby Austin at age 15, Robison began writing his own material, drawing equal influence from rock and country; stints in the bands Chaparral and Two Hoots & a Holler followed, and he also joined the Millionaire Playboys, an all-star Austin ensemble. After contributing to albums from Alejandro Escovedo and Kelly Willis, Robison made his solo debut in 1995 with Bandera; Life of the Party followed three years later. Teaming up with his younger brother, Bruce, and fellow Texan Jack Ingram, in 2000 the trio released the appropriately named Unleashed Live. A second studio effort, Step Right Up, was issued in spring 2001. ~ Jason Ankeny

  • ORIGIN
    Bandera, TX
  • GENRE
    Country
  • BORN
    September 1, 1964

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