32 Songs, 1 Hour 51 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Live at Leeds is rightfully considered one of the greatest concert albums of all time, and it brought the record-buying public a version of The Who that had previously never been caught on record. The set's thunderous anarchy and the explosive energy from each member established The Who as a band ready for the '70s. The 40th-anniversary edition of Leeds included this show from Hull City Hall, recorded two days later. The concerts are nearly identical in terms of setlists (at Hull, The Who doesn't include "Magic Bus"), with the second set of the night being a full-on performance of Tommy. The energy, however, is different. Hull has a slightly more subdued vibe and a few technical glitches, which have been repaired acceptably. Fact is, these are phenomenal performances from a first-rate rock 'n' roll band in its prime. Fans with a serious interest in the music should immerse themselves in the beauty of Keith Moon's singular approach to drumming, Pete Townshend's blistering guitar work, Roger Daltrey's guttural howls, and John Entwistle's lyrical bass lines. This was a band in the true sense of the word.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Live at Leeds is rightfully considered one of the greatest concert albums of all time, and it brought the record-buying public a version of The Who that had previously never been caught on record. The set's thunderous anarchy and the explosive energy from each member established The Who as a band ready for the '70s. The 40th-anniversary edition of Leeds included this show from Hull City Hall, recorded two days later. The concerts are nearly identical in terms of setlists (at Hull, The Who doesn't include "Magic Bus"), with the second set of the night being a full-on performance of Tommy. The energy, however, is different. Hull has a slightly more subdued vibe and a few technical glitches, which have been repaired acceptably. Fact is, these are phenomenal performances from a first-rate rock 'n' roll band in its prime. Fans with a serious interest in the music should immerse themselves in the beauty of Keith Moon's singular approach to drumming, Pete Townshend's blistering guitar work, Roger Daltrey's guttural howls, and John Entwistle's lyrical bass lines. This was a band in the true sense of the word.

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