14 Songs, 1 Hour 10 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Taped by the legendary soundman Owsley "Bear" Stanley, Live at the Carousel Ballroom, 1968 features—in beautifully intimate sound quality—a previously unavailable concert by Big Brother with Janis Joplin on June 23, 1968. It's the first in a proposed series of concerts recorded by the man best known as a LSD manufacturer. The performances are revelatory and capture the band on an excellent night, with Joplin in prime form and aware of the tunes that made her legend. Gershwin's "Summertime," "Ball and Chain," and "Piece of My Heart" are all here, with Joplin still playing the songs with a free hand. Guitarist James Gurley, an underrated player due to the band's reputation for being inconsistent, shines throughout, as does the rhythm section, who play the blues like they're running for their lives. Jamming on its home turf, the group is loose and comfortable. Owsley refused to overdub phony applause, so the sound is quiet, and the performance is exactly as it happened. Press materials suggest the stereo speakers be pushed together to best hear Owsley's intended effect. 

EDITORS’ NOTES

Taped by the legendary soundman Owsley "Bear" Stanley, Live at the Carousel Ballroom, 1968 features—in beautifully intimate sound quality—a previously unavailable concert by Big Brother with Janis Joplin on June 23, 1968. It's the first in a proposed series of concerts recorded by the man best known as a LSD manufacturer. The performances are revelatory and capture the band on an excellent night, with Joplin in prime form and aware of the tunes that made her legend. Gershwin's "Summertime," "Ball and Chain," and "Piece of My Heart" are all here, with Joplin still playing the songs with a free hand. Guitarist James Gurley, an underrated player due to the band's reputation for being inconsistent, shines throughout, as does the rhythm section, who play the blues like they're running for their lives. Jamming on its home turf, the group is loose and comfortable. Owsley refused to overdub phony applause, so the sound is quiet, and the performance is exactly as it happened. Press materials suggest the stereo speakers be pushed together to best hear Owsley's intended effect. 

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Ratings and Reviews

3.6 out of 5
11 Ratings
11 Ratings
cyberghostx13 ,

Sounds Bad

I love Janis Joplin, but this album just doesn't sound good at all, and nostalgia is only as good as it sounds. Sorry JJ RIP.

mcfripp11 ,

1960

not bad at all...the lead guitar playing is quite good...the backing vocals as usual are the weak point to every s.f. 60's band or maybe just all american bands from this era...don't believe all the hype...brit rock bands absolutely dominate from '68-'82...i've been trying to figure out exactly why this is my whole life but it just is...american bands simply can't compete...oh well

ListenUp (~)\(~) ,

Fifty Years & Still Sounding Raw w/Energy

Janis may have been a brief phenomon from the late 60's. But her power trancends time. Hearing this live 1968 San Fran concert for the first time, reminds us of the emotiomnaly charged expressive raw energy Janis capitivated listeners with. My only dig here is i wish her male counterpart here was a tad bit muted... after all, Janis has it, just fine... as the years ahead would prove. That being said, this si a fine live rendition of Janis & Big Brother in their early days. Thanks Bear. Thanks for captiring sucha remarkable show.

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