12 Songs, 54 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Iron Butterfly have become known as a one-hit wonder group thanks to the very long title track to their second album: the side-long “In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida.” Yet the band, despite a constantly shifting lineup, were one of the heaviest groups of the late '60s. Led by the unusual vocal histrionics of Doug Ingle, whose organ work was the heaviest this side of Deep Purple, Iron Butterfly can hear their influence in the grunge bands of the early ‘90s, who, consciously or not, borrowed elements of their sound. This lo-fi but perfectly acceptable-sounding early live performance—recorded months before the band's 1968 debut, Heavy—features six songs from that record, along with “Lonely Boy” and “Filled with Fear” from the group’s third album (Ball) and a cover of Allen Toussaint’s “Get Out of My Life, Woman,” which the band did release as an early b-side in a studio recording. It’s not far removed from the vibe of early live Doors concerts, but with a determinedly heavier guitar sound. Tracks like “Gloomy Day to Remember” and “Got to Ignore Evil Temptations” sound like dirty, howling garage rock.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Iron Butterfly have become known as a one-hit wonder group thanks to the very long title track to their second album: the side-long “In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida.” Yet the band, despite a constantly shifting lineup, were one of the heaviest groups of the late '60s. Led by the unusual vocal histrionics of Doug Ingle, whose organ work was the heaviest this side of Deep Purple, Iron Butterfly can hear their influence in the grunge bands of the early ‘90s, who, consciously or not, borrowed elements of their sound. This lo-fi but perfectly acceptable-sounding early live performance—recorded months before the band's 1968 debut, Heavy—features six songs from that record, along with “Lonely Boy” and “Filled with Fear” from the group’s third album (Ball) and a cover of Allen Toussaint’s “Get Out of My Life, Woman,” which the band did release as an early b-side in a studio recording. It’s not far removed from the vibe of early live Doors concerts, but with a determinedly heavier guitar sound. Tracks like “Gloomy Day to Remember” and “Got to Ignore Evil Temptations” sound like dirty, howling garage rock.

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