13 Songs, 1 Hour, 16 Minutes

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Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5

10 Ratings

10 Ratings

Huh?

RocketVTX,

This sounds like it was recorded on an iPhone.

John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers ‘Live in 1967'

Steve Douglas,

Name the great guitarists of the British Invasion of the sixties, Jack Bruce, Eric Clapton, Mick Taylor, Peter Green John McVie, Jimmy Page and so many more who went on to fame in such groups as Cream, The Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, Canned Heat and Fleetwood Mac and they had their initial major exposure as members of or contributors to the famed John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers. Back when Reel to Reel was considered high end recording, a fan snuck in a one channel reel to reel tape recorder to tape John Mayall’s group over a period of five London club gigs. How John Mayall got his hands on this fan’s recording is a mystery to me, but I am grateful that he did. While in no way is this recording ‘high fidelity’ the audio puts you right in that smokey club atmosphere, the same atmosphere I spent my teen years every weekend at the Filmore East and other clubs in New York City. The recording was clearly cleaned up removing any white noise, hiss and other audio disparities, but retains the club ambience that makes this CD so invaluable to both music historians and those with an affinity for the blues. None of these recordings have been released anywhere else on either released CDs or bootlegs.
This specific recording features John Mayall, Peter Green, John McVie and Mick Fleetwood before they moved on to other groups. Trust me when I say this, this was before the blues was pasteurized by the heavy influence of pure rock and yet you can still hear what these blues influences would lead to. John Mayall had yet to become a household name in the U.S. and he is in fine voice when he is not blowing that unique harp sound that would eventually would become so well recognized. On other numbers included on this CD, Mayall’s organ fills in and elevates songs such as ‘Double Trouble’ and ‘I Can’t Quit You Baby’ with the organ playing call and response against Peter Green’s soulful but powerful as all get out lead guitar.
At almost every blues jam I have ever attended or when listening to most any blues based cover band, the performing of ‘Stormy Monday’ can always be expected. If you want to really feel the down-home blues of this song as it was intended, the Bluesbreakers give it what it should always be given, terrific and heartfelt guitar leads, strong but basic rhythm provided by Mick Fleetwood and John McVie and vocals that reach out and grab you by the lapels.
Crowd ambience sneaks into these recordings simply adding to that smokey club feel I referred to previously. It doesn’t distract or take away, but puts you front and center for what must have been an enviable front seat at these club dates. With ‘Live in 1967’ you are transported back in time and have your very own front and center seat. A darn fine album.

I do hope this review has been of some help to you in deciding upon your purchase.
Thanks for reading.

Yeccccccccchhhhhhh…...

The Bradleyss,

Yet another black eye on John Mayall’s recording reputation. The sound quality on this album is horrendous. Yes, it does sound as if the band was in fine form, but this still shouldn’t have been released; the audio is bootleg quality at best. Unlistenable. By the way, half of the “great guitar players of the British invasion” mentioned in the first review above weren’t guitar players at all.

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