15 Songs, 1 Hour 30 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Fans of Martin Sexton's first live album Live Wide Open should check out his 2008 live follow-up simply entitled Solo. But where that one features only two closing songs where Sexton is joined by a band, this one abounds with what sounds like a three- piece ensemble throughout. And listen closely and marvel at this – there is no bass player. In addition to singing, playing guitar and even approximating some wailing guitar solos with his mouth, Sexton has also detuned his guitar's low E string and is simultaneously using his thumb to work in some amazing bass parts. He impressively pulls it off (especially in the beginning of "Beast in Me") while drummer Joe Bonadio keeps the rhythm driving, dynamic and danceable. Guitar virtuoso Nils Lofgren makes a guest appearance on a boozy, bluesy cover of John Brim's "Ice Cream Man," but otherwise it's just Sexton and Bonadio making a live duo configuration sound like a power trio, or even a quartet, on songs like "Gypsy Woman." Although the recorded version from 1996's Black Sheep plays at just under five minutes, this epic rendition of "Gypsy Woman" unfolds into a semi-psychedelic, eastern tinged, extend-o-jam that plays on for well over 16 minutes.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Fans of Martin Sexton's first live album Live Wide Open should check out his 2008 live follow-up simply entitled Solo. But where that one features only two closing songs where Sexton is joined by a band, this one abounds with what sounds like a three- piece ensemble throughout. And listen closely and marvel at this – there is no bass player. In addition to singing, playing guitar and even approximating some wailing guitar solos with his mouth, Sexton has also detuned his guitar's low E string and is simultaneously using his thumb to work in some amazing bass parts. He impressively pulls it off (especially in the beginning of "Beast in Me") while drummer Joe Bonadio keeps the rhythm driving, dynamic and danceable. Guitar virtuoso Nils Lofgren makes a guest appearance on a boozy, bluesy cover of John Brim's "Ice Cream Man," but otherwise it's just Sexton and Bonadio making a live duo configuration sound like a power trio, or even a quartet, on songs like "Gypsy Woman." Although the recorded version from 1996's Black Sheep plays at just under five minutes, this epic rendition of "Gypsy Woman" unfolds into a semi-psychedelic, eastern tinged, extend-o-jam that plays on for well over 16 minutes.

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