11 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

This debut by New Zealand’s Annabel Alpers starts off with an eerily quiet tune that steadily picks up pace, layering in an easy snare, slightly countrified guitar, strings and what sounds like flute, or perhaps a Mellotron, just as a chorus of vocal tracks begin taking off overhead, like jets on a runway. “Instructions for Insomniacs” is a beautiful surprise, and lays the groundwork for My Electric Family, named for the artist’s affection for computers (and “machines”). Guitars — reverbed, fingerpicked or effects-laden — and gliding, multi-tracked vocals are set against the sounds of pulsing, gurgling, keyboards. Like a nerdy cousin to Bat for Lashes, Bachelorette works with ambient textures and occasional bursts of sheer pop joy (try “Mindwarp” on for a taste), but she tempers the pop sheen with no small amount of electronic acoutrement (“Long Time Gone,” “Dream Sequence”). “Her Rotating Head” soars on a cool disco rhythm, while the blinking “Technology Boy” recalls the groundbreaking work of Laurie Anderson. Alpers’ occasional nods to ’60 girl-group pop isn’t so surprising, considering that her take on the future of music is firmly rooted in the past.

EDITORS’ NOTES

This debut by New Zealand’s Annabel Alpers starts off with an eerily quiet tune that steadily picks up pace, layering in an easy snare, slightly countrified guitar, strings and what sounds like flute, or perhaps a Mellotron, just as a chorus of vocal tracks begin taking off overhead, like jets on a runway. “Instructions for Insomniacs” is a beautiful surprise, and lays the groundwork for My Electric Family, named for the artist’s affection for computers (and “machines”). Guitars — reverbed, fingerpicked or effects-laden — and gliding, multi-tracked vocals are set against the sounds of pulsing, gurgling, keyboards. Like a nerdy cousin to Bat for Lashes, Bachelorette works with ambient textures and occasional bursts of sheer pop joy (try “Mindwarp” on for a taste), but she tempers the pop sheen with no small amount of electronic acoutrement (“Long Time Gone,” “Dream Sequence”). “Her Rotating Head” soars on a cool disco rhythm, while the blinking “Technology Boy” recalls the groundbreaking work of Laurie Anderson. Alpers’ occasional nods to ’60 girl-group pop isn’t so surprising, considering that her take on the future of music is firmly rooted in the past.

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5

19 Ratings

Sublime

BrooklynJack,

Recently saw her at an outdoor music thing in Manhattan. Couldn't take my eyes off of her. Very in tune performance, and the music is lovely and thoughtful.

amazing

Virginia Morin,

please purchase at least the national grid. i sing it all the time while im in class or in the library. its so beautiful.

About Bachelorette

The project of Christchurch, New Zealand's Annabel Alpers, Bachelorette mixes '60s psychedelia and girl group pop with folk and lots and lots of vintage electronics. Inspired by acts spanning the Beatles and Smiths to Aphex Twin and Kraftwerk, Alpers began playing in bands in the '90s. She started in a group called Mouse before singing and playing keyboard in the trippy surf rock band Hawaii 5-0, and the electronic noise bands Space Dust and the Hiss Explosion. When Hawaii 5-0 broke up, she lived in Shanghai for a time before returning to New Zealand, and enrolled in the University of Auckland's post-graduate music studies program. While studying computer composition, Alpers also focused on her own songs, recording at home and in her friends' studios as well as the University's facilities. Her first release as Bachelorette, the End of All Things EP, was released in 2005, and won acclaim for Alpers' unique, intimate take on electronic pop. For her debut album, 2007's Isolation Loops, she sequestered herself for three months in a cabin her great-grandfather built in a fishing village near the mouth of the Rakaia River; the album's more complicated arrangements and concept about the end of a relationship made it a significant advance in her music. She performed as a solo artist during the Isolation Loops tour, but for her next album My Electric Family, which was released in 2009, Alpers expanded Bachelorette into a full-fledged band, adding Andrea Holmes and Mick Elborado to the fold. The group took a gentler, more expansive approach on 2011's Bachelorette. ~ Heather Phares

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